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Funeral Homes > Wisconsin

Funeral Homes in Wisconsin (WI)

Funeral homes, funeral directors, mortuaries, crematoriums and  by city in Wisconsin. Select a Wisconsin city to view local funeral home services, locations, addresses, and phone numbers for each listing.

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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Rafters with a winning mark for first time - WAOW

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Madison, WI – June 5, 2012 – Another tight game against the Mallards took place at Witter Field Tuesday night, and the Wisconsin Rapids Rafters (4-3) clawed a victory against Madison (3-4) for the second straight night in front of 1,049. It...

Doris C. Hammes

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Emma Kreis, who had recently emigrated from Germany. She attended St. James Grade School and Aquinas High School, La Crosse, graduating from Aquinas in 1946. She studied bookkeeping at Western Wisconsin Technical College and then worked for Ed Phillips and Midwest Bottle Gas. She was a charter member of St. Patrick’s Parish in Onalaska. In 1960, she married William G. Hammes at St. Patrick’s Church in Onalaska. They were the first couple to be married in the new church. Their one child, Rose, was born in 1962. In the 1970s, she “retired” from her first career and spent the next 25 ye... (La Crosse Tribune)

A Titanic survivor's Fort Wayne roots - News Sentinel

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Lillian moved to Kansas and married portrait painter Paul Lawrence, who apparently died not long after their marriage, according to the website Titanic Research. In 1903, while visiting friends in Wisconsin, she met Dr. William E. Minahan, a prominent physician in Fond du Lac, Wis., it says in the copy of her obituary on the Encyclopedia Titanica website. They married later that year, with a newspaper item saying the wedding was at the bride's home in Kansas City, and a William Minahan profile in the 1912 book “Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin, past and present” stating the wedding took place in Arkansas City, Kan., which is south of Wichita. The fateful trip William and Lillian Minahan and William's sister, Daisy Minahan, had been visiting relatives in Ireland before boarding the Titanic for their trip home, Titanic Research reports. They booked first-class passage, staying in Cabin C78, Encyclopedia Titanica reports. Lillian had ticket No. 19928. When the Titanic struck the iceberg, William Minahan helped his wife and sister into Lifeboat 14, Titanic Research reports. He told them, “Be brave,” and joined other men staying on the ship so women and children could flee in the lifeboats. Lillian, then age 37, and Daisy, 33, were among the 700 survivors, most of whom were picked up by the Carpathia, one of the first ships to reach the site, Titanic Research says. The ship Mackay-Bennett was dispatched to help pick up bodies, and it brought back William Minahan — one of 337 bodies recovered, Titanic Research says. After the tragedy Daisy Minahan, who had health problems before the Titanic disaster, reportedly declined quickly after the disaster. She moved to California and died April 30, 1919, in Los Angeles, slightly more than seven years after the sinking, Titanic Research states. Lillian also moved to California and went on to remarry two more times, Titanic Research reports. She settled finally in Laguna Beach, Calif., in 1947 and lived there until her death at age 86 on Jan. 13, 1962.

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Web. • A failure to act. In Pennsylvania, Maryland and Wisconsin, the EPA sent investigators to scores of sites from 2004 to 2006 after verifying a lead smelter once operated. The investigators recommended soil tests in the neighborhoods. Most of the tests were not done. • A failure to protect. Even when state and federal regulators tested soil and found high levels of lead, as they did around sites in Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Portland, Ore., they failed for years to alert neighbors or order cleanups. Some kids who played in yards with heavily contaminated soil have dangerous levels of lead in their bodies, according to medical records obtained by USA TODAY. In response to the investigation and USA TODAY’s soil tests in 21 neighborhoods across the nation, government officials are taking action at old smelter sites in 14 states, ranging from reopening flawed investigations to testing soil to cleaning up contaminated property. In March, New York City officials closed four ball fields in a Brooklyn park after learning from USA TODAY that the area was a former smelter site with elevated levels of lead. “EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t waiting for the government to...

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Web. • A failure to act. In Pennsylvania, Maryland and Wisconsin, the EPA sent investigators to scores of sites from 2004 to 2006 after verifying a lead smelter once operated. The investigators recommended soil tests in the neighborhoods. Most of the tests were not done. • A failure to protect. Even when state and federal regulators tested soil and found high levels of lead, as they did around sites in Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Portland, Ore., they failed for years to alert neighbors or order cleanups. Some kids who played in yards with heavily contaminated soil have dangerous levels of lead in their bodies, according to medical records obtained by USA TODAY. In response to the investigation and USA TODAY’s soil tests in 21 neighborhoods across the nation, government officials are taking action at old smelter sites in 14 states, ranging from reopening flawed investigations to testing soil to cleaning up contaminated property. In March, New York City officials closed four ball fields in a Brooklyn park after learning from USA TODAY that the area was a former smelter site with elevated levels of lead. “EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t waiting for the government to...

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Web. • A failure to act. In Pennsylvania, Maryland and Wisconsin, the EPA sent investigators to scores of sites from 2004 to 2006 after verifying a lead smelter once operated. The investigators recommended soil tests in the neighborhoods. Most of the tests were not done. • A failure to protect. Even when state and federal regulators tested soil and found high levels of lead, as they did around sites in Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Portland, Ore., they failed for years to alert neighbors or order cleanups. Some kids who played in yards with heavily contaminated soil have dangerous levels of lead in their bodies, according to medical records obtained by USA TODAY. In response to the investigation and USA TODAY’s soil tests in 21 neighborhoods across the nation, government officials are taking action at old smelter sites in 14 states, ranging from reopening flawed investigations to testing soil to cleaning up contaminated property. In March, New York City officials closed four ball fields in a Brooklyn park after learning from USA TODAY that the area was a former smelter site with elevated levels of lead. “EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t waiting for the government to...

Roger C. Molander Dies at 71; Stirred Nuclear Protests

Sun, Apr 1, 2012
Roger Carl Molander was born on Nov. 20, 1940, in Perham, Minn., and grew up in Marinette, Wis. He graduated from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, with a degree in mechanical engineering and earned a doctorate from the University of California, Berkeley. In 1973 as a Defense Department official, he was an aide to Paul Nitze, the chief American negotiator with the Soviets. Mr. Molander moved to the National Security Council as a senior staff member in 1974. Ground Zero dissolved into local initiatives and other peace organizations after the big 1982 demonstration, as Mr. Molander moved on to the Roosevelt Center for Policy Studies, a research group, as president and chief executive. He continued to work on arms control, as well as economic policy and other issues. He developed role-playing educational games to educate the public. Under the auspices of the Roosevelt Center, in 1988 Mr. Molander tried to elevate the discussion of arms issues among presidential candidates in the two earliest states to vote, Iowa and New Hampshire. He set up “crash courses” to bring candidates “up to speed” on these questions. Mr. Molander then became a senior analyst at the RAND Corporation. He developed many of the research organization’s “The Day After ...” projects, in which a hypothetical crisis is examined to determine what could have been done differently. In addition to his daughter Egan and his twin brother, Earl, Mr. Molander is survived by his wife of 37 years, Mary Moore; another daughter, Ingrid Molander; and two granddaughters. Earl and Roger Molander wrote an article for The Los Angeles Times in April 1982, pushing the idea that Russian-American conviviality might help peace. “So bring on the Russians,” they wrote. “Try their vodka, listen to their music, read their novels, watch them dance. Maybe take one to lunch and start a conversation on a topic of mutual interest. Try ‘the fate of the earth,’ for starters.” ... (New York Times)

The Sad End of the Gingrich Campaign - New Republic

Sun, Apr 1, 2012
How hard it must be for Gingrich at 68 to accept that his active political career is over for good. So Newt and Callista, according to a schedule released by the campaign Sunday, will be holding Wisconsin rallies at the end of the week in advance of the April 3 primary. It undoubtedly will be Potemkin Village Politics—scant crowds, minimal press coverage, but with the purported trappings of a presidential campaign. Since, according to Politico, Gingrich has begun paying off vocal campaign creditors, there should be enough money left for a Wisconsin weekend in presidential primary fantasy camp. The dream, as Gingrich has told it, began with a 15-year-old boy’s tour of World War I battlefields in 1958. It was at Verdun that Gingrich probably got his first inkling that his historical role would be to rescue America from the fate of Old Europe. What we do know for sure is that the 1994 Capitol takeover ignited Gingrich’s White House dreams. In the House speaker’s office, Gingrich began actively plotting a 2000 campaign. A breakthrough Republican House victory in 1998 would set things up—and that was all but guaranteed, since ...

Kentucky Wildcats top NCAA basketball tournament field - Greenville News

Thu, Mar 22, 2012
MSU under coach Tom Izzo and his “we’ll-play-anyone-any-time-any-place” philosophy. The improvement rooted there. Michigan State’s romp to the title game -- the Spartans blitzed Wisconsin 65-52 in the semifinals and Iowa 92-75 in the quarterfinals -- was even more impressive considering they lost third-leading scorer Branden Dawson to a season-ending knee injury March 4. MSU’s leading scorer Sunday with 21 points, Brandon Wood, is a senior who completed his eligibility at Valparaiso last year and transferred for a shot at the big time. “Just to be a part of the tournament, it’s something I’ve always dreamed of,” Wood said. “It’s just a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.” It was Michigan State’s first Big Ten tourney championship since 2000, the year MSU won its second NCAA championship and first under Izzo. “It was just a great feeling to see that No. 1 seed pop up,” said Green, a native of Flint, Mich. “We always see the No. 1 seeds pop up and the people celebrating. So it’s a great feeling to see ourselves pop up as the No. 1 seed and being able to celebrate it and watch it on TV.” Green is hoping for a third trip to the Final Four. He helped MSU advance as a freshman and sophomore. This team is as good as those, maybe better, Green said. “I would have to say this is the best team that I’ve played on for the simple fact that this team constantly fights through everything.” SUBHED Like Kentucky, Syracuse made its path to the top line seem easy. Only Notre Dame on Jan. 21 and Cincinnati last week in the Big East tournament quarterfinals tripped the Orange, who will play North Carolina Asheville on Thursday in Pittsburgh. The Orangemen do not have an All-American but succeed with balance. Senior Kris Joseph averages a modest 13.8 points, and sophomore Dion Waiters, one of the best sixth men in the nation, 12.6. Players seem unaffected by the report from Yahoo sports last week that at least 10 players tested positive for banned substances in the past decade. That includes the 2002-03 team when Syracuse won a national title under Hall of Fame coach Jim Boeheim. Syracuse acknowledged an ongoing NCAA inquiry into possible violations of the school’s athletic drug policy. (Page 3 of 3) In a different case, Boeheim is being sued for defamation by two men he had criticized for bringing allegations of child sexual abuse against a longtime assistant the school eventually fired. As those events unfolded, the...

George John Zukowski, Jr. - St. George Daily Spectrum

Thu, Mar 22, 2012
ST. GEORGE - George John Zukowski, Jr., age 70, passes away March 1, 2012 peacefully in his sleep. He was born July 23, 1941 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to Glenadean Motherway and George John Zukowski, Sr. He later married Patricia A. Mitchell. George is survived by his wife, Patrici...



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