Funeral Homes in ABERDEEN

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Aberdeen, SD  Funeral Homes

The following funeral service provider list is in Aberdeen, South Dakota. Please select a funeral home listing below to view more details about local services provided.
 
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Carlsen Funeral Home and Crematory
715 Lancelot Drive
Aberdeen , SD 57401
(605) 225-2281
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Miller Huebl Funeral Home
1111 South Main Street
Aberdeen , SD 57401
(605) 225-8223
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Send Flowers to Miller Huebl Funeral Home

Schriver s Memorial Mortuary and Crematory
414 5th Avenue Northwest
Aberdeen , SD 57401
(605) 225-0691
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Send Flowers to Schriver s Memorial Mortuary and Crematory

Sunset Memorial Gardens
Po Box 655
Aberdeen , SD n, SD
(605) 225-5361
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Things to Do - LubbockOnline.com

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Zumba — 8:30 a.m. Studio 57, 5701 Slide Road, Unit C. All ages. $5 per class. 785-5701. Meditation Classes — 7-8:30 p.m. KMC Texas-Lubbock, 6701 Aberdeen Ave., Suite No. 4. Meditation for everyone. Adults, $10 and students, $5. 787-2499. Exercise Class for Special Needs — 4-5 p.m. High Point Village, 10911 Slide Road. 698-0015. TUESDAY Belly Dancing — 6:30 p.m. UMC Activities Center, 5217 82nd St. 783-9035. Creative Writing — 10 a.m.-noon, Cimarron Room, Carillon, 1717 Norfolk Ave. For seniors. 281-6278. Lubbock Area Square and Round Dance Federation — 8 p.m. LASRDF Dance Center, 2305 120th St. Tuesday Rounds Round Dance Club. 799-1324, 799-6734. Taekwondo — 5:30 and 6:30 p.m. Maggie Trejo Center, 3200 Amherst St. All ages. First lesson free, $25 a month. 767-2705. Health and Healing God’s Way — 2-3 p.m. Hastings Bookstore, 50th Street and Indiana Avenue. Learn how to avoid disease and pain many different ways. Free personal evaluation. Call for appointment. 281-6276. Pilates Stretch — 11 a.m. UMC Activities Center, 5217 82nd St. 783-9035. Zumba — 6:45 p.m. Hodges Community Center, 4011 University Ave. Ages teen and older. $20 monthly. 767-3706. T’ai Chi Chih — 8:30-9:30 a.m. YWCA, 3105 35th St. Suitable for all ages. 792-2723. Zumba — 6 p.m. YWCA, 3101 35th St. 792-2723. Zumba — 8:30 a.m. Studio 57, 5701 Slide Road, Unit C. All ages. $5 class. 785-5701. Zumba Lite — 5:30 p.m. Studio 57, 5701 Slide Road, Unit C. All ages. $5 per class. Designed for beginners. 785-5701. Write Right — 6:30-8 p...

Alex Cassie, Who Aided ‘Great Escape’ From Nazis, Dies at 95

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Lieutenant Cassie. “As a piece of cinematic entertainment, it ranks very highly, but it isn’t a particularly accurate historical record,” Mr. Cassie told the Scottish newspaper The Aberdeen Press and Journal in 2000, which pointed out that there was no jaunty, baseball-throwing, McQueen-like American leading the breakout. Of the forgers, Lieutenant Cassie was “the most distinctive, in appearance anyway,” Mr. Brickhill wrote in his book, with a “great thatch of long ginger hair that fell over his eyes like a Skye terrier and little tufts of ginger beard sticking out of isolated spots around his jaw.” Lieutenant Cassie had been the pilot of a Royal Air Force bomber, flying missions over Germany and France, when his plane was shot down after it attacked a submarine in the Bay of Biscay in September 1942. He and his crew were picked up by a French fishing boat and turned over to the German authorities. The lieutenant was immediately taken to Stalag Luft III. He remained there until January 1945, when, with the Soviets advancing from the east, the Germans emptied the P.O.W. camps and forced thousands of prisoners to march west. They were liberated by the British in April. Alexander Cassie, known as Sandy, was born in Cape Province, South Africa, on Dec. 22, 1916, the only child of George and Jessie Cassie, who had emigrated from Scotland. After high school, he went to Scotland and began studying psychology at the University of Aberdeen. “I always had a pencil in my hand and had always been a competent artist and used to do covers for the university rag magazine,” he told The Aberdeen Press and Journal. In 1940, two years after graduating, he joined the R.A.F. Mr. Cassie’s wife of 56 years, the former Jean Stone, died in 2005. Besides his son, he is survived by a daughter, Rosalyn Postance, and four grandchildren. In 2004, 17 of the prisoners who had been involved in the great escape, Mr. Cassie among them, reunited at the Imperial War Museum in London. Archaeologists had excavated one of the tunnels at Stalag Luft III, the British newspaper The Telegraph reported, adding, “Artifacts recovered include a rubber stamp carved from the heel of an airman’s boot and used to forge documents for escapers.” ... (New York Times)

From slave to business owner: William Quincy Atwood - Ledger Independent

Wed, Feb 22, 2012
Alabama and declared they could not be emancipated according to state law. But that court gave the money to two children already living in Ohio. (Henry Atwood took two of his older children to Aberdeen, Ohio, so they would be free sometime before 1851.) Since they were free they could inherit money, according to what was then called the 'Common Law' of Alabama, which was taken from Roman law, according to manuscripts. Also according to Alabama laws at that time, masters had no common law right to emancipate slaves because the common law had not recognized slavery. If slaves could not be freed directly by the owner, why should the law allow them to be freed by a trust,  according to information from Auburn University Archives. But Beck argued, that owners had absolute control over their property, because slave owners could take slaves to free states to free them. Furthermore, this power could be transmitted to an executor of a will, according to Auburn University Archives. Both parties appealed the decision until the case was reviewed by the Alabama Supreme Court. Finally, the state supreme court justices left the decision to Beck. The justices wrote there is no valid objection to the validity of the trusts but no mode had been provided for the enforcement of carrying out Henry Atwood's wishes. So it became the responsibility of the person carrying out the will, according to the Alabama Supreme Court Records --Atwood's Heirs vs. Beck. "...He (executor) must be left to his own conscience, and to the obligation imposed by this official oath, yet, as we have seen that the trusts are not illegal, and the removal may lawfully be made by the representative of the deceased, it is clear the court will not interfere to prevent the trustee from complying with and carrying out the lawful desire of the testator (deceased father)," according to Atwood's Heirs vs. Beck. While the court battle went on for years, the children and their mothers were taken to Ohio by someone because they arrived in Ripley, May 15, 1853. There were no accounts found how this happened but at least some of their father's wishes were carried out, despite opposition by his sister's family and the laws of Alabama. William and his brothers went to a black school in Ripley. Then in 1856, William went to Iberia College, Iberia, Ohio, until spring of 1859. In the 1860 Ohio census: J.M. Atwood, 24, Williams Atwood, 22, John Atwood, 21, and D.W. Atwood, each have a real estate value of $15,700 and a personal value of $2,000. All of the young men were Henry Atwood's sons, according to documents. However, this money could have been from ventures that William Atwood and his brother, John Stiles Atwood delved into while they traveled to California in 1859. According to the Delta College Library archives, they operated a restaurant, were horse dealers, and eventually invested in gold and silver mining during the Gold Rush. William returned in 1860 or 1861 to Ripley, where he taught school and talked about the war, according to Simmons. Sometime during this period, he traveled to Saginaw, Mich., and opened a logging business. When he was about 23 years old, at the outbreak of the Civil War, he organized a volunteer black troop in Ripley. But black troops were not accepted at the start of the war. So he returned to Saginaw and continued to build an empire in the lumber business. He married in 1872, to Charlotte M. Eckles of Georgia, in Cleveland, who graduated from a school in Salem, Mass. They had five children, according to the Delta College library. He was prominent in Republican politi...

Dobbs put children in need first - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Fri, Jan 20, 2012
Journal story about Dobbs when she retired in 1994. Growing up in Scotland, Dobbs decided at an early age to use her own gifts to help others. She was admitted to study medicine at the University of Aberdeen in Scotland at age 16. She graduated from medical school when she was 21. Dobbs, 82, died Jan. 10 at her home in Keystone, Colo., where she and her pediatrician husband, Harold "Hap" Dobbs, moved in 1998 after raising a family and retiring in Shorewood. In Keystone, the couple lived across the road from a ski hill that they skied regularly, even after Dobbs was diagnosed with ovarian cancer in 2006. She skied between chemo treatments, according to daughter Jane Somers of Milwaukee. "They ended up in the place they loved, summer and winter," said Somers, recalling that her mother also had...

James A. Cook Sr. - People's Tribune

Wed, Jan 18, 2012
Lincoln Christian College and an interim pastorate in Havana, Ill.He returned to full time pastoral care at Ashland, Ill., Vandalia, Panama City, Fla., Beardstown, Ill., Petersburg, Ill., and Aberdeen, Miss prior to retiring in Portland where he provided pulpit supply for Pilot Grove, High Hill, and Gasconade churches.In addition, Jim conducted numerous evangelistic crusades and revival meetings throughout the United States. While in Mississippi, he provided leadership for the Christian State Convention.Memorial gifts are suggested to First Christian Church Building Fund. Condolences may be sent to the family online at www.buchanancody.com.

NY Times writer who covered JFK assassination dies - Houston Chronicle

Sun, Dec 4, 2011
New York's Attica prison. Wicker, the son of a railroad man, started in journalism in 1949 at the weekly Sandhill Citizen in Aberdeen, N.C., where he was paid $37.50 a week to report on such local news stories as the discovery of "the first beaver dam in anyone's memory on a local creek." He moved on to a local daily and then to the larger Winston-Salem Journal, where he worked for most of the 50s, with time out in 1957-58 to serve as a Nieman fellow at Harvard University. He went to work for the Nashville Tennessean in 1959 but then a year later was hired by Reston. In mid-1961, when Times veteran Bill Lawrence abruptly quit his post as White House correspondent in a dispute with management, Wicker got the assignment. He said it was a dream assignment — "sooner or later most of the government's newsworthy business passes through the White House" — and especially covering the excitement of the Kennedy era. After the president's assassination, he described Jackie Kennedy as she left the hospital in Dallas: "Her face was sorrowful. She looked steadily at the floor," he wrote. "She still wore the raspberry-colored suit in which she greeted welcoming crowds in Fort Worth and Dallas. But she had taken off the matching pillbox hat she had worn earlier in the day, and her dark hair was windblown and tangled. Her hand rested lightly on her husband's coffin as it was taken to a waiting hearse." In 1966, Wicker was named a na...

Tom Wicker, RIP - StarNewsOnline.com (blog)

Wed, Nov 30, 2011
He made his way to Chapel Hill and (with time out for World War II) graduated with a journalism degree in 1947. He later worked for the Sandhill Citizen in Aberdeen, N.C., the Winston-Salem Journal and the Nashville Tennessean, with time out as a Nieman Fellow at Harvard in 1957-58. Obituaries recalled Wicker’s moment in Nov. 22, 1963, when as the Times’ White House correspondent, he was riding in the presidential motorcade in Dallas when the shots rang out in Dealey Plaza. His story on the Kennedy assassination — dictated from a phone booth — all but covered pages 1 and 2 of the Times the next day and marked him for a quick ascent. The next year, he succeeded James Reston as the Times’ Washing...

David “Davey” Howard Hayes

Mon, Nov 28, 2011
July 10, 1969 - Oct. 23, 2011 David "Davey" Howard Hayes, 42, died Oct. 25. He was born to Marlene (Inglis) and Lawrence Hayes in Aberdeen, Wash. He had two brothers, Robert and Johnny. Davey had his first daughter, Davena (Hayes) with Brenda Anderson. Davey later met Rhonda Bishop. Together they had a daughter, Tabatha, and son Devan Hayes. He also gained a bonus son, Chris Brown. Davey loved spending time with friends and family. He also loved to laugh and have fun. Davey "Papa" left behind three granddaughters, Lilyann, S... (Albany Democrat-Herald)

NY Times writer who covered JFK assassination dies - Atlanta Journal Constitution

Mon, Nov 28, 2011
New York's Attica prison. Wicker, the son of a railroad man, started in journalism in 1949 at the weekly Sandhill Citizen in Aberdeen, N.C., where he was paid $37.50 a week to report on such local news stories as the discovery of "the first beaver dam in anyone's memory on a local creek." He moved on to a local daily and then to the larger Winston-Salem Journal, where he worked for most of the 50s, with time out in 1957-58 to serve as a Nieman fellow at Harvard University. He went to work for the Nashville Tennessean in 1959 but then a year later was hired by Reston. In mid-1961, when Times veteran Bill Lawrence abruptly quit his post as White House correspondent in a dispute with management, Wicker got the assignment. He said it was a dream assignment — "sooner or later most of the government's newsworthy business passes through the White House" — and especially covering the excitement of the Kennedy era. After the president's assassination, he described Jackie Kennedy as she left the hospital in Dallas: "Her face was sorrowful. She looked steadily at the floor," he wrote. "She still wore the raspberry-colored suit in which she greeted welcoming crowds in Fort Worth and Dallas. But she had taken off the matching pillbox hat she had worn earlier in the day, and her dark hair was windblown and tangled. Her hand rested lightly on her husband's coffin as it was taken to a waiting hearse." In 1966, Wicker was named a national columnist, replacing retiring Times' icon Arthur Krock, who had covered 10 presidents. Wicker's first column reported on a political rally in Montana. He would later say that it was a huge step to move from detached observer to opinion holder — and especially in the times he was writing. "My own transition from reporter to columnist coincided roughly with the immense American political re-evaluation that sprang in the sixties from the Vietnam War and the movement against it, from the ghetto riots in the major cities, and from the brief flowering of the counterculture," Wicker wrote in his 1978 book, "On Press." Wicker was not lacking in opinions, though, and over the years took strong and sometimes unpredictable stands, emphasizing such issues as the nation's racial divide. On race, he said in a 1991 interview in the Times: "I think the attitudes between the races, the fear and the animosity that exist today, are greater than, let us say, at the time of the Brown case, the famous school desegregation decision in 1954." Although Wicker was attacked by President Richard Nixon and Vice President Spiro Agnew for his negative coverage during the Nixon administration, he argued in a 1991 book, "One of Us: Richard Nixon and the American Dream," that Nixon accomplished much in his presidency and deserves a high ranking in history. In his final column, published Dec. 29, 1991, Wicker commented on the fall of the Soviet Union and urged President George H.W. Bush to "exercise in a new world a more visionary leadership" on non-military issues like the environment. "As the U.

Grace Viola Seichter

Sun, Nov 20, 2011
Lyle, Darla and James; two great grandchildren, Lola and Aracela; five brothers, Stanley Jones of Green Bay, Kenneth (Hope) Jones of Merrill, Richard Jones of Tomahawk, William (Irma) Jones of Aberdeen, Md. and Terry (Judy) Jones of Irma; and one sister, Sally (Fred) Hatina of Tomahawk. She is preceded in death by: her parents and husband Herbert in 2010. Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 21, at St. Joseph’s Catholic Church in Boyd, with Father William Felix officiating. Internment will take place in the Parish Cemetery at a later date. Visitation will be from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. on Sunday at the Plombon Funeral Home in Stanley, and from 9:30 a.m. until time of services Monday at the funeral home. (The Chippewa Herald)




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