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Denmark, SC  Funeral Homes

The following funeral service provider list is in Denmark, South Carolina. Please select a funeral home listing below to view more details about local services provided.
 
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Mercer Funeral Home
17536 Heritage Highway
Denmark , SC 29042
(803) 793-4211
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Saturday's High School Results - Greenville News

Sun, Feb 26, 2012
Half: WH 27-13. Records: WH 27-1, Clinton 20-7. Lower State Dreher 53, Lower Richland 43 Upper State Columbia 43, Keenan 36 Lower State Bishop England 61, Lake City 50 Upper State Abbeville 54, Denmark-Olar 51 Lower State Timmonsville 56, C.E. Murray 36 BASEBALL Blue Ridge 11, Berea 4 WP: Rider (1-0). Hitters: Wheeler (BR) 2-4, 2 2B; Lancaster (BR) 2-3; Coster (BR) 2B. Records: BR 1-0, Berea 0-1. WRESTLING STATE INDIVIDUAL MEET At Civic Center of Anderson CLASS AAAA 106 – 1. Jackson Myers (Lexington), 2. Alex Roberts (Hillcrest), 3. James Sass (Summerville), 4. Devon Faile (Rock Hill) 113 – 1. Hector Contreras (Dorman), 2. Andrew Szalwinski (Lexington), 3. Cody Bridgeman (Westside), 4. Javon Jordan (Fort Dorchester) 120 – 1. Jordan Wigger (Summerville), 2. Nicholas Young (Stratford), 3. Joseph Brown (Spartanburg), 4. Blake Risinger (Lexington) 126 – 1. Jason Huger (Wando), 2. Chris Armstrong-McIntyre (Spartanburg), 3. Joey Antoine (Westside), 4. Dyllan Hurlburt (Wren) 132 – 1. Austin Such (Riverside), 2. Gavin Perkins (Summerville), 3. Devin Horgan (Hillcrest), 4. Abdule Shabazz (Goose Creek) (Page 2 of 3) 138 – 1. Versean Ponds (Dorman), 2. Bishop Ashley (Rock Hill), 3. Walker Barfield (Lexington), 4. Chad Wood (Summerville) 145 – 1. Will Thomas (Dorman), 2. Erik Williams (Hanna), 3. Greg Groce (Conway), 4. Robbie Haselrig (Rock Hill) 152 – 1. Dequon Wilson (Fort Dorc...

For Road Warriors, life means long trips, frequent changes - Greenville News

Sun, Jan 22, 2012
During his five-year professional career, Sean Perkins has played for eight teams, including ones in Scotland, Denmark and Sweden. The 25-year-old has played in Missouri and Cincinnati, actually twice in Cincy. Adding to his travel resume, he calls suburban Detroit home. (Page 2 of 4) “You get used to moving,” Perkins says. “It’s always new faces.” Young guys — they hail from the U.S., Canada and Europe — come into the league here after being drafted by NHL clubs, as free agents or by being traded. Some older guys are making a last stand in the ECHL, getting one more season of paychecks. Whatever their part in the cycle, moving from team to team is part of the lifestyle. T.J. Reynolds, the Road Warriors’ captain and the oldest team member at age 30, has seen more of the country than most. The 10-year veteran played his 500th minor league game in December, but Reynolds doesn’t lament that he’s yet to play in the NHL. Instead, he counts himself lucky. Lucky to still be playing, even if that includes a recent 12-day road trip that found the Road Warriors living up to their name as they traveled to five states. “That weighs on you,” Reynolds says. “In the NHL, they’re home most nights. They finish a game and get on the private plane and get to go home.” Road trips are a mixed bag. The Road Warriors are treated well. They travel on a tricked-out bus that includes bunks for every player, a satellite TV, refrigerator, microwave oven, DVD player and more. It’s all the creatures comforts of home, except the home. “We’ll have a game in Chicago and friends will go, ‘Oh, that will be great,’ ” says goalie Bryan Hince, who joined the team on New Year’s Eve. “But you don’t get to see Chicago. We’re actually playing in a suburb, and all we’ll see is the hotel and the arena.” A kid's game Despite the travel, the uncertainty, every single player feels blessed to be playing hockey and making a living at it. “I get to be a little kid for a while longer,” Perkins says, “and play the game I love.” Reynolds is in his second year with the R...

For Road Warriors, life means long trips, frequent changes - Greenville News

Sun, Jan 22, 2012
During his five-year professional career, Sean Perkins has played for eight teams, including ones in Scotland, Denmark and Sweden. The 25-year-old has played in Missouri and Cincinnati, actually twice in Cincy. Adding to his travel resume, he calls suburban Detroit home. (Page 2 of 4) “You get used to moving,” Perkins says. “It’s always new faces.” Young guys — they hail from the U.S., Canada and Europe — come into the league here after being drafted by NHL clubs, as free agents or by being traded. Some older guys are making a last stand in the ECHL, getting one more season of paychecks. Whatever their part in the cycle, moving from team to team is part of the lifestyle. T.J. Reynolds, the Road Warriors’ captain and the oldest team member at age 30, has seen more of the country than most. The 10-year veteran played his 500th minor league game in December, but Reynolds doesn’t lament that he’s yet to play in the NHL. Instead, he counts himself lucky. Lucky to still be playing, even if that includes a recent 12-day road trip that found the Road Warriors living up to their name as they traveled to five states. “That weighs on you,” Reynolds says. “In the NHL, they’re home most nights. They finish a game and get on the private plane and get to go home.” Road trips are a mixed bag. The Road Warriors are treated well. They travel on a tricked-out bus that includes bunks for every player, a satellite TV, refrigerator, microwave oven, DVD player and more. It’s all the creatures comforts of home, except the home. “We’ll have a game in Chicago and friends will go, ‘Oh, that will be great,’ ” says goalie Bryan Hince, who joined the team on New Year’s Eve. “But you don’t get to see Chicago. We’re actually playing in a suburb, and all we’ll see is the hotel and the arena.” A kid's game Despite the travel, the uncertainty, every single player feels blessed to be playing hockey and making a living at it. “I get to be a little kid for a while longer,” Perkins says, “and play the game I love.” Reynolds is in his second year with the R...

For Road Warriors, life means long trips, frequent changes - Greenville News

Sun, Jan 22, 2012
During his five-year professional career, Sean Perkins has played for eight teams, including ones in Scotland, Denmark and Sweden. The 25-year-old has played in Missouri and Cincinnati, actually twice in Cincy. Adding to his travel resume, he calls suburban Detroit home. (Page 2 of 4) “You get used to moving,” Perkins says. “It’s always new faces.” Young guys — they hail from the U.S., Canada and Europe — come into the league here after being drafted by NHL clubs, as free agents or by being traded. Some older guys are making a last stand in the ECHL, getting one more season of paychecks. Whatever their part in the cycle, moving from team to team is part of the lifestyle. T.J. Reynolds, the Road Warriors’ captain and the oldest team member at age 30, has seen more of the country than most. The 10-year veteran played his 500th minor league game in December, but Reynolds doesn’t lament that he’s yet to play in the NHL. Instead, he counts himself lucky. Lucky to still be playing, even if that includes a recent 12-day road trip that found the Road Warriors living up to their name as they traveled to five states. “That weighs on you,” Reynolds says. “In the NHL, they’re home most nights. They finish a game and get on the private plane and get to go home.” Road trips are a mixed bag. The Road Warriors are treated well. They travel on a tricked-out bus that includes bunks for every player, a satellite TV, refrigerator, microwave oven, DVD player and more. It’s all the creatures comforts of home, except the home. “We’ll have a game in Chicago and friends will go, ‘Oh, that will be great,’ ” says goalie Bryan Hince, who joined the team on New Year’s Eve. “But you don’t get to see Chicago. We’re actually playing in a suburb, and all we’ll see is the hotel and the arena.” A kid's game Despite the travel, the uncertainty, every single player feels blessed to be playing hockey and making a living at it. “I get to be a little kid for a while longer,” Perkins says, “and play the game I love.” Reynolds is in his second year with the R...

Exposed: New Documentary About Gas Drilling Hailed as Indie and Balanced, But ... - truthout

Thu, Oct 13, 2011
It all began in November 2009 at the Sheffield Film Festival in England. From England to Denmark to Texas - an "Independent" Film Hits Prestigious Venues Haynesville started off with a splash unseen by most small, independent films. In November 2009, the film premiered at the prestigious Sheffield Film Festival in England. In a press release announcing the global premiere, director Gregory Kallenberg stated, "I was floored when I found out...The head programmer from the festival personally called to tell me how much he liked the film, and that Sheffield wanted it to premiere in their festival. In the film fest world, that kind of thing just doesn't happen." At the Sheffield Film Festival, Haynesville was one of the nominees for the prestigious Green Doc Award. (It did not win, but it's a bit ironic to think that a dirty gas industry propaganda film was even considered a candidate in a green documentary competition.) It was shortly thereafter featured at the December 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark. In conjunction with the COP-15 conference itself, the U.N. sponsored the Indigenous Voices on Climate Change Film Festival. Haynesville was one of the 22 films screened, even though it has nothing to do with indigenous voices on climate change. Haynesville has also played in front of other influential audiences, ranging from the New Orleans Film Festival, the Aspen Ideas Festival this past summer and TEDx Austin, among others. The film made its national television premier in November 2010 on CNBC, a television channel owned by NBC/Universal, which is owned in part by General Electric (GE) -- GE, lo and behold, is a big player in the natural gas industry. GE created a device for recycling the water used during the controversial and toxic hydraulic fracturing (fracking) process. Furthermore, it maintains natural gas fueled power plants, and manufactures natural gas-powered turbines, having sold more than $1 billion worth of them in 2011 in the United States, according to Reuters. GE also recently made a a hr...

The Ten Best of the MAMI Fest - Firstpost

Thu, Oct 13, 2011
Mumbai’s premiere film festival gets underway on 13 October (tomorrow), here’s our selection of some of the films that may tickle your senses over the coming week, in all the right ways. Melancholia (Denmark/2011/Col./130') A devastating turn from Kirsten Dunst in Melancholia. Image courtesy: Film Impressions It’s a shame that the cinematic achievement that is Lars Von Trier’s Melancholia has been all but obscured by his pro-Nazi comments uttered in jest at a Cannes press conference. The director was dec...

Exposed: New Documentary About Gas Drilling Hailed as Indie and Balanced, But ... - truthout

Thu, Oct 6, 2011
It all began in November 2009 at the Sheffield Film Festival in England. From England to Denmark to Texas - an "Independent" Film Hits Prestigious Venues Haynesville started off with a splash unseen by most small, independent films. In November 2009, the film premiered at the prestigious Sheffield Film Festival in England. In a press release announcing the global premiere, director Gregory Kallenberg stated, "I was floored when I found out...The head programmer from the festival personally called to tell me how much he liked the film, and that Sheffield wanted it to premiere in their festival. In the film fest world, that kind of thing just doesn't happen." At the Sheffield Film Festival, Haynesville was one of the nominees for the prestigious Green Doc Award. (It did not win, but it's a bit ironic to think that a dirty gas industry propaganda film was even considered a candidate in a green documentary competition.) It was shortly thereafter featured at the December 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark. In conjunction with the COP-15 conference itself, the U.N. sponsored the Indigenous Voices on Climate Change Film Festival. Haynesville was one of the 22 films screened, even though it has nothing to do with indigenous voices on climate change. Haynesville has also played in front of other influential audiences, ranging from the New Orleans Film Festival, the Aspen Ideas Festival this past summer and TEDx Austin, among others. The film made its national television premier in November 2010 on CNBC, a television channel owned by NBC/Universal, which is owned in part by General Electric (GE) -- GE, lo and behold, is a big player in the natural gas industry. GE created a device for recycling the water used during the controversial and toxic hydraulic fracturing (fracking) process. Furthermore, it maintains natural gas fueled power plants, and manufactures natural gas-powered turbines, having sold more than $1 billion worth of them in 2011 in the United States, according to Reuters. GE also recently made a a hr...

Raymond Karpen

Sun, Oct 2, 2011
Maple Grove Bible Church, where Ray attended since that time. He enjoyed hunting, fishing and visiting with family and friends. Raymond is survived by:  two stepsons, Dennis (Grace) Shilts of Denmark, Wis. and Micheal (Linda) Shilts of Stanley; seven stepgrandchildren and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by: his wife, Goldie in 1994; four sisters, Anna Marie Glowiak, Lucille Laundrie, Gladys Gilbert and Alice Karpen. Funeral services will be Tuesday, Oct. 4th, 2011 at  11 a.m. at the Maple Grove Bible Church, 2494 350th St. Stanley, Wis. 54768 with Pastor Steve Mohr officiating. Family and friends may call from 9:30-11 a.m. Tuesday morning at the church. Interment with Military Honors will take place at the Northern Wisconsin Veterans Memorial Cemetery in Spooner. The family would like to express a Thank You to the staff at The Homeplace for the excellent care Ray r... (The Chippewa Herald)

Exposed: New Documentary About Gas Drilling Hailed as Indie and Balanced, But ... - truthout

Fri, Sep 30, 2011
It all began in November 2009 at the Sheffield Film Festival in England. From England to Denmark to Texas - an "Independent" Film Hits Prestigious Venues Haynesville started off with a splash unseen by most small, independent films. In November 2009, the film premiered at the prestigious Sheffield Film Festival in England. In a press release announcing the global premiere, director Gregory Kallenberg stated, "I was floored when I found out...The head programmer from the festival personally called to tell me how much he liked the film, and that Sheffield wanted it to premiere in their festival. In the film fest world, that kind of thing just doesn't happen." At the Sheffield Film Festival, Haynesville was one of the nominees for the prestigious Green Doc Award. (It did not win, but it's a bit ironic to think that a dirty gas industry propaganda film was even considered a candidate in a green documentary competition.) It was shortly thereafter featured at the December 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference in Copenhagen, Denmark. In conjunction with the COP-15 conference itself, the U.N. sponsored the Indigenous Voices on Climate Change Film Festival. Haynesville was one of the 22 films screened, even though it has nothing to do with indigenous voices on climate change. Haynesville has also played in front of other influential audiences, ranging from the New Orleans Film Festival, the Aspen Ideas Festival this past summer and TEDx Austin, among others. The film made its national television premier in November 2010 on CNBC, a television channel owned by NBC/Universal, which is owned in part by General Electric (GE) -- GE, lo and behold, is a big player in the natural gas industry. GE created a device for recycling the water used during the controversial and toxic hydraulic fracturing (fracking) process. Furthermore, it maintains natural gas fueled power plants, and manufactures natural gas-powered turbines, having sold more than $1 billion worth of them in 2011 in the United States, according to Reuters. GE also recently made a a hr...

Holyfield

Tue, Aug 30, 2011
Holyfield Tuesday, August 30, 2011 12:05 PM CDT TEXARKANA – Annie M. Denmark Holyfield died Friday, August 26, 2011 in Texarkana. Services will be held at 10 a.m. Thursday, September 1, 2011 with Rev. Carl Lester Jones officiating. Interment will follow in Mount Moriah Cemetery in Avinger under the direction of the Reeder-Davis Funeral Home of Hughes Springs.Mrs. Holyfield was born May 4, 1938 in Avinger. She was a member of College Hill Missionary Baptist Church i... (Daily Tribune)




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