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Funeral Homes > Pennsylvania

Funeral Homes in Pennsylvania (PA)

Funeral homes, funeral directors, mortuaries, crematoriums and  by city in Pennsylvania. Select a Pennsylvania city to view local funeral home services, locations, addresses, and phone numbers for each listing.

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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Thomas E. Davis, railroader - Baltimore Sun

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
June 15 of multiple sclerosis at Stella Maris in Timonium. He was 60. Thomas Edward Davis, the son of railroaders — his parents were ticket agents at Pennsylvania Station — was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville. He was a 1970 graduate of Dulaney High School and after attending the University of Maryland, Baltimore County for a year went to work for Penn Central ...

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Web. • A failure to act. In Pennsylvania, Maryland and Wisconsin, the EPA sent investigators to scores of sites from 2004 to 2006 after verifying a lead smelter once operated. The investigators recommended soil tests in the neighborhoods. Most of the tests were not done. • A failure to protect. Even when state and federal regulators tested soil and found high levels of lead, as they did around sites in Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Portland, Ore., they failed for years to alert neighbors or order cleanups. Some kids who played in yards with heavily contaminated soil have dangerous levels of lead in their bodies, according to medical records obtained by USA TODAY. In response to the investigation and USA TODAY’s soil tests in 21 neighborhoods across the nation, government officials are taking action at old smelter sites in 14 states, ranging from reopening flawed investigations to testing soil to cleaning up contaminated property. In March, New York City officials closed four ball fields in a Brooklyn park after learning from USA TODAY that the area was a former smelter site with elevated levels of lead. “EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Sheft...

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Web. • A failure to act. In Pennsylvania, Maryland and Wisconsin, the EPA sent investigators to scores of sites from 2004 to 2006 after verifying a lead smelter once operated. The investigators recommended soil tests in the neighborhoods. Most of the tests were not done. • A failure to protect. Even when state and federal regulators tested soil and found high levels of lead, as they did around sites in Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Portland, Ore., they failed for years to alert neighbors or order cleanups. Some kids who played in yards with heavily contaminated soil have dangerous levels of lead in their bodies, according to medical records obtained by USA TODAY. In response to the investigation and USA TODAY’s soil tests in 21 neighborhoods across the nation, government officials are taking action at old smelter sites in 14 states, ranging from reopening flawed investigations to testing soil to cleaning up contaminated property. In March, New York City officials closed four ball fields in a Brooklyn park after learning from USA TODAY that the area was a former smelter site with elevated levels of lead. “EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Sheft...

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Web. • A failure to act. In Pennsylvania, Maryland and Wisconsin, the EPA sent investigators to scores of sites from 2004 to 2006 after verifying a lead smelter once operated. The investigators recommended soil tests in the neighborhoods. Most of the tests were not done. • A failure to protect. Even when state and federal regulators tested soil and found high levels of lead, as they did around sites in Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Portland, Ore., they failed for years to alert neighbors or order cleanups. Some kids who played in yards with heavily contaminated soil have dangerous levels of lead in their bodies, according to medical records obtained by USA TODAY. In response to the investigation and USA TODAY’s soil tests in 21 neighborhoods across the nation, government officials are taking action at old smelter sites in 14 states, ranging from reopening flawed investigations to testing soil to cleaning up contaminated property. In March, New York City officials closed four ball fields in a Brooklyn park after learning from USA TODAY that the area was a former smelter site with elevated levels of lead. “EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Sheft...

Let's once again salute passing heroes of WWII for what they did for us - News Sentinel

Sun, Mar 25, 2012
The USO was at the Pennsylvania Station. I had a built-in baby sitter — my father — so I was able to work there many hours. I've written before about making sandwiches and brewing coffee to be ready when the next troop train pulled in and we would be able to serve the steady stream of servicemen. We heard about homes all over the country and oohed and aahed over pictures of families in those homes. We answered questions and smiled a lot, even though that was sometimes not easy to do. And there were occasional dances, although I didn't go to those; they were for unmarried, young women who were delightful dancing partners. There was vmail. It was thin paper to be folded just so to go to servicemen. It was suggested we write only good news for mental health reasons. And there were letters coming back with blobs of ink making some passages impossible to read. Censorship was legal. And we were — by omnipresent posters — reminded to be cautious in what we said. “Loose lips sink ships,” they said. Security was tight. Actually, when my mother died, we were unable to send news of her death to my brother. He was at sea with radio silence. We sat around our radios listening and hoping and praying. Ed Murrow became a tremendously respected friend whom we listened to every evening. We felt safe here in our Indiana city, but we ached for people abroad whose homes and places of worship were being destroyed. And in the mind always there was fear when seeing a Western Union messenger on his bike. “Is he coming here? Please don't come here.” These men whose deaths we are now reading about came home and made new lives and took their citizenship and other obligations seriously and life went on. They were heroes, real-for-sure heroes, who gave up their comfortable lives at home — and here we are, living in the land of the free — and definitely the home of the brave. Let's salute them once again and remember what they did for us. Betty E. Stein is a retired teacher.

Speakers detail history of anti-slavery movement in Hockessin - Brandywine East Community News

Thu, Mar 22, 2012
Hockessin on a farm on Old Public Road. When he was about 30, with a wife and young daughter, he bought a farmhouse on Old Wilmington Road, between the Hockessin Friends Meeting House and the Pennsylvania border. An obituary of this Quaker farmer and teacher states that "his house was one of the 'stations' on the 'Underground Railroad', and many fugitives were fed thereat and helped by him on to liberty." Obituaries written after the death of his daughter Lydia also refer to her parents' house as an underground station. Heald and his wife Sarah opposed slavery, subscribed to antislavery literature, and raised their children to follow the golden rule and the inner monitor, "What does thy conscience tell thee?" The Healds’ farmhouse is still standing and is privately owned.

*UPDATE* A Rolling Stone Gathers No Facts - NorthcentralPa.com

Tue, Mar 6, 2012
It fails because nothing resembling original reporting can be found anywhere in it. According to an item posted on Friday by John Hanger, former Pennsylvania DEP secretary and CEO of PennFuture, a leading environmental group: “[Rolling Stone’s] Jeff Goodell … should split his pay with the NYT gas reporter, because Goodell regurgitates all the NYT’s greatest gas hits, including ones that the NYT public editor found to be misleading or false.” Below, we take a look at some of the more obvious errors that contributed to what, in the end, was a pretty ridiculous piece. – Rolling Stone: “Fracking, it turns out, is about producing cheap energy the same way the mortgage crisis was about helping realize the dreams of middle-class homeowners.” Federal Reserve economist: “Natural gas prices that slumped to a 10-year low this month could save U.S. consumers $16.5 billion on home energy bills over the course of a year, according to a senior economist at the U.S. Federal Reserve. U.S. households might see total savings from lower gas prices of as much as $113 billion a year through 2015, including tack-on effects such as lower product prices and higher wages generated by cheaper fuel.” (Bloomberg, Jan. 25, 2012) IHS CERA: “If shale gas had not radically changed the picture beginning in 2007, the US would have to rely on large quantities of … imports, and US consumers would be paying over two times more for natural gas. Savings from lower gas prices amount to $926 per year in disposable household income between 2012 and 2015. In 2035, these savings would increase to nearly $2,000 per household.” (Dec. 2011, p. 37) Associated Press: “A 35 percent collapse in the futures price the past year has been a boon to homeowners who use natural gas for heat and appliances and to manufacturers who power their factories and make chemicals and materials with it …. Residential gas and electric customers are saving roughly $200 a year, according to a study by Navigant Consulting.” (AP, Jan. 16, 2012) Columbus Dispatch: “[Columbia Gas of Ohio] is reducing the average monthly payment per household from $82 to $53, a savings of $29, or 35?percent. The savings will vary based on each customer’s energy usage. … The abundance of natural gas is behind the low gas prices.” (Columbus Dispatch, Feb. 29, 2012) Harrisburg Patriot-News: “[A]ccording to a Public Utility C...

*UPDATE* A Rolling Stone Gathers No Facts - NorthcentralPa.com

Tue, Mar 6, 2012
It fails because nothing resembling original reporting can be found anywhere in it. According to an item posted on Friday by John Hanger, former Pennsylvania DEP secretary and CEO of PennFuture, a leading environmental group: “[Rolling Stone’s] Jeff Goodell … should split his pay with the NYT gas reporter, because Goodell regurgitates all the NYT’s greatest gas hits, including ones that the NYT public editor found to be misleading or false.” Below, we take a look at some of the more obvious errors that contributed to what, in the end, was a pretty ridiculous piece. – Rolling Stone: “Fracking, it turns out, is about producing cheap energy the same way the mortgage crisis was about helping realize the dreams of middle-class homeowners.” Federal Reserve economist: “Natural gas prices that slumped to a 10-year low this month could save U.S. consumers $16.5 billion on home energy bills over the course of a year, according to a senior economist at the U.S. Federal Reserve. U.S. households might see total savings from lower gas prices of as much as $113 billion a year through 2015, including tack-on effects such as lower product prices and higher wages generated by cheaper fuel.” (Bloomberg, Jan. 25, 2012) IHS CERA: “If shale gas had not radically changed the picture beginning in 2007, the US would have to rely on large quantities of … imports, and US consumers would be paying over two times more for natural gas. Savings from lower gas prices amount to $926 per year in disposable household income between 2012 and 2015. In 2035, these savings would increase to nearly $2,000 per household.” (Dec. 2011, p. 37) Associated Press: “A 35 percent collapse in the futures price the past year has been a boon to homeowners who use natural gas for heat and appliances and to manufacturers who power their factories and make chemicals and materials with it …. Residential gas and electric customers are saving roughly $200 a year, according to a study by Navigant Consulting.” (AP, Jan. 16, 2012) Columbus Dispatch: “[Columbia Gas of Ohio] is reducing the average monthly payment per household from $82 to $53, a savings of $29, or 35?percent. The savings will vary based on each customer’s energy usage. … The abundance of natural gas is behind the low gas prices.” (Columbus Dispatch, Feb. 29, 2012) Harrisburg Patriot-News: “[A]ccording to a Public Utility C...

Circulation manager loved people

Wed, Feb 29, 2012
J. Mr. Lambert worked at two newspapers before joining The Commercial Appeal. Otis L. Sanford, the newspaper's former managing editor, developed a close friendship with Mr. Lambert over their love of Pennsylvania football. Sanford: Pittsburgh Steelers. Mr. Lambert: Philadelphia Eagles. "The guy had an unbelievable, amazing magnetic personality," said Sanford, who is a professor at the University of Memphis who holds the Hardin Chair of Excellence in Journalism. "I always appreciated how much he loved newspapers. He had an amazing understanding of just how important they are to a community." As much as he loved the newspaper, Mr. Lambert also fell in love with Memphis during the six years he lived here. His Facebook page spreads a picture of the lighted Hernando DeSoto Bridge across the top. He loved attending Memphis events like the Live in the Garden Series at the Memphis Botanic Garden, said Paul Jewell, marketing director. "He always had something good to say," said Maria McLendon, director of marketing and communications for the Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce. "He always made you feel better about yourself. You never walked away from Lou without a smile on your face." He dressed in a white jumpsuit, dark glasses long sideburns and dark hair during Elvis Week in 2008. He passed out fans and sold newspapers. Elvis Christmas music blared from his office every December. On his first blog post for 2012, Mr. Lambert made several resolutions for 2013 so he had time to work on them. There were typical ones, such as not procrastinating and not forwarding chain e-mails. At the top he used a quote: "I resolve to laugh every day, eat more chocolate, sleep in on Sundays, make dinner an event, breathe more deeply, spend more time with the people I love." His funeral arrangements are incomplete. -- Cindy Wolff: (901) 529-2378 ... (The Commercial Appeal)

Obama's assault on freedom of religion targets Catholics - Tulsa Beacon

Sun, Feb 26, 2012
Should Obama be re-elected, that will be on his agenda.And another “victory” for the pro-abortion crowd is going on at Shippensburg University in Pennsylvania. Students there can now get the “morning-after” pill by sliding $25 into a vending machine.What?The student health center at Shippensburg, a public college of 8,300 students in the Cumberland Valley, provides the Plan B One Step emergency contraceptive in the vending machine along with condoms, decongestants and pregnancy tests.There’s one more college marked off the list of schools where I will send my teenage daughter.What message does this send to students? It says, go ahead and have sex and we will try to mitigate the consequences. There is no sense of right or wrong.The school says the vending machine is a great idea because some students are too embarrassed to get the stuff at a pharmacy. They should be embarrassed and that embarrassment should deter them from bad (and sinful) behavior.The abortion pill is available to anyone 17 or older without a prescription and every student at Shippensburg is at least 17. Maybe they should change the name of the school to “Sleepingaroundburg.”Freedom of religion and the sanctity of human life are at risk in America. God help us if we don’t make a stand and straighten this culture out. • The phone rang in the obituary department of the local newspaper.“How much does it cost to have an obituary printed”? asked a woman.“It’s five dollars a word, ma’am,” the clerk replied politely.“Fine,” said the woman after a moment. “Got a pencil?”“Yes ma’am.” “Got some paper?” “Yes ma’am.” “Okay, write this down: ‘Cohen dead’.”That’s all?” asked the clerk disbelievingly.“That’s it.”“I’m sorry ma’am, I should have told you - there’s a five word minimum.”“Yes, you should’ve,” snapped the woman. Now let me think a minute… okay, got a pencil?”“Yes ma’am.”?“Got some paper?” “Yes, ma’am.”“Okay, here goes: ‘Cohen dead. Cadillac for Sale.’”• Jake had been a devout Christian and was in the hospital, near death.The family called their pastor, to be with them. As the pastor stood next to the bed, Jake’s condition appeared to deteriorate rapidly and he motioned frantically for something to write on.The pastor lovingly handed him a pen and a piece of paper, and Jake used his last bit of energy to scribble a note, then he died. The pastor thought it best not to look at the note at that time, so he placed it in his jacket pocket. At the funeral, as he was finishing his eulogy, he realized that he ?was wearing the same jacket that he was wearing when Jake died.He said, “You know, Jake handed me a note just before he died. I haven’t looked at it yet, but knowing Jake, I’m sure there’s a word of inspiration there for us all. “He opened the note, and read, “Hey, you’re standing on my oxygen tube!”• A policeman pulled a car over and told the driver that because he had been wearing his seatbelt …… he had just won $5,000 dollars in the statewide safety competition.“What are you going to do with the money?” asked the policeman.“Well, I guess I’m going to get a driver’s license,” he answered.“Oh, don’t listen to him,” yelled the woman in the passenger seat. “He’s a real jerk when he’s drunk.”This woke up the guy in the back seat, who took one look at the cop and moaned, “I knew we wouldn’t get far in a stolen car.”At that moment, there was a knock from the trunk and a voice said, in Spanish, “Are we over the border yet?” This entry was posted on Thursday, February 23rd, 2012 and is filed under Columns.



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