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Funeral Homes > Oregon > Ontario

Ontario, OR  Funeral Homes

The following funeral service provider list is in Ontario, Oregon. Please select a funeral home listing below to view more details about local services provided.
 
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Haren Wood Crematory
2543 Southwest 4th Avenue
Ontario , OR 97914
(541) 889-9335
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Lienkaemper Chapel
78 Northwest 1st Avenue
Ontario , OR 97914
(541) 372-2235
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Scott K. Rohring, Buffalo native, trial attorney

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Scott was a family man, a true gentleman and an outstanding attorney,” said his boss, Steve Barnes. “His loss is a shock and a great loss to our firm.” Mr. Rohring lived with his family in the Ontario County Town of Farmington. His interests included motorsports and he was a member of the BMW Car Club of America. Survivors include his wife, the former Rebecca Abramoski; a daughter, Kathryn; and a son, Alexander. A Mass of Christian Burial will be offered at noon Monday in St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 95 N. Main St., Canandaigua. (The Buffalo News)

Mike Connell: End of the Underground Railroad - Port Huron Times Herald

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
St. Clair River to freedom on the Canadian shore. It was another 30 miles to the Dawn Settlement, a community of free blacks in Dresden, Ontario, and the inspiration for Harriet Beecher Stowe’s famed novel, Uncle Tom’s Cabin. “Mr. Thompson, a liberal minded and kindly man, was greatly respected as a teacher and preacher in the local church,” local historian Rosamonde H. Earle wrote in 1969. “Being an abolitionist in these pre-Civil War days, his house became a station in the Underground Railroad for slaves escaping over the river into Canada. But how many were sheltered by this good man has never been known.” «« »» ANOTHER HISTORIAN, Suzanne Wesbrook Frantz, is the undisputed local expert on Thompson. She wrote about him in “Whispers Along the Rive...

Leslie 'Les' Clinton Drew

Tue, Jan 31, 2012
Doctor of Philosophy in Zoology in 1963.  While at Michigan State, he was curator of exhibits.  On collection programs, he was a member of expeditions to Mexico, principally Durango, Northern Ontario, and northwest Manitoba to collect biological and illustrative materials for museum dioramas.  Les also went to Beaver Island, Mich. to collect wintering birds and mammals.While at Beaver Island, to shoot and classify birds, they used an 8 gauge shotgun they strapped down and used like a cannon, as they were not hunters.  We still have the picture of Les with his colleagues on the island, smoking tobacco pipes.One of Les’passions was birthed from his studies at Michigan State, the study of spiders.  Through his study and love for insects came five journal publications.  He was a well-known arachnologist, entomologist and zoologist in the university system and in the United States.After receiving his doctorate, Les put his education to work as part of the Peabody Museum at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut from 1966 to 1967.  His official title was Assistant to the Director, where he coordinated activities of the Exhibits and Educational staffs.In 1967 – 1977, Les was appointed Director of the Museum of the Rockies and Professor of Zoology (tenured) in Bozeman, Montana.  The building with which you are all familiar, (W. Kagy Boulevard), was Les’ legacy.  Prior exhibits were in the “Dairy Barn” on campus.  Les led the planning, fundraising and construction effort to build dedicated buildings for the Museum at its present site.  The first module opened in 1972 and the second module and connecting corridor opened in 1974.  Under Les’ direction, the Museum of the Rockies became a more professional museum with proper registration of collections, paid staff, and new exhibits, such as the popular 1930’s house which still stands in the Museum of the Rockies history hall.  Les resigned in 1978.Les served as the director of the Museu... (Lewistown News-Argus)

For Road Warriors, life means long trips, frequent changes - Greenville News

Sun, Jan 22, 2012
Perkins says, “and play the game I love.” Reynolds is in his second year with the Road Warriors, and he’s dreamed of being a pro hockey player since he was a toddler in Kitchener, Ontario. “I’d be playing in the backyard rink and wouldn’t come in the house.” Cornelius is one of the few college graduates on this team of 20-somethings. He has a degree from Iowa State University in engineering. In fact, he worked while going to school and playing hockey. He’s actually losing money by playing, not that he regrets it for a single second. (Page 3 of 4) “I know I’ve always got that in my pocket,” he says. “I’ve already done the real-world stuff. But eight hours a day in front of a computer isn’t that exciting to me right now. Hockey is.” Players don’t get rich. The average ECHL player’s salary is $525 a week. But with free housing, a per diem for food on the road, and one or two days off a week, it’s a nice gig. The pro athletes make friends quickly. There are parties — there are women — and there are stories they won’t tell. “We have a good following here,” Reynolds says. “People will notice you on the street and talk to you. Greenville is nice and clean; it reminds me of Canada.” It also reminds Reynolds and his teammates of all the other guys they’ve every played with all the way back to midget hockey where everyone dreamed of playing the game professionally. “Maybe .001 percent of players ever get to play in the pros,” Perkins says. “My first year in the league, there were probably 70 or 80 guys on the team throughout the year” (rotating through the 20-man roster). “You can have one bad game, or two bad games, and you’re out of there,” Reynolds says. “It’s the name of the game.” Like the others, Hince says he dreamed of playing hockey since he was 3. To give it up now would be nearly impossible. He recalls being a little depressed one day and lamenting being away from home. “And my coach said to me, and I can remember his words exactly,” Hince says, “ ‘You’ve got a friend back home who’s having his best day, and you’re having your worst day, and yet he’d give anything to trade with you.’ ” NHL dreams There’s a lot of free timefor professional athletes. During the 72-game season there are days off, and there is the almost four-month off-season. When there’s no game, practice only takes about two hours. Weekday games usually start at 7 p.m., so there’s an entire day to kill. They hang out in Greenville. They play video games. They gladly do appearances on behalf of the team. They pretty much kill time until they get back on the ice. (Page 4 of 4) But they also have time to think. Hince has enjoyed a seven-year relationship with the same woman who is back home in Kapukasing, Ontario. In the off-season, he works with her dad building custom homes. “I know that’s what I’m going to end up doing,” he says. “And there’s a lot more money in that.” Reynolds knows at age 30 he has to think about his future, too. He has been approached about coaching. “But what I want more than anything is stability,” he says. “The appeal of stability, a 9-to-5 job, a house and weekends off, that’s going to be nice.” All of the guys admit they’ve lost girlfriends who, given other circumstances, might have become wives. “I’ve met a few girls,” Reynolds says, “that I would have gotten serious with if I had stability. So coaching is out for me because it will be the same life. When this is over, it’s over.” The few married guys have their wives with them, living part of the year wherever there’s hockey to be played and in the off-season scrambling to pick up some extra money. That often means teachi...

For Road Warriors, life means long trips, frequent changes - Greenville News

Sun, Jan 22, 2012
Perkins says, “and play the game I love.” Reynolds is in his second year with the Road Warriors, and he’s dreamed of being a pro hockey player since he was a toddler in Kitchener, Ontario. “I’d be playing in the backyard rink and wouldn’t come in the house.” Cornelius is one of the few college graduates on this team of 20-somethings. He has a degree from Iowa State University in engineering. In fact, he worked while going to school and playing hockey. He’s actually losing money by playing, not that he regrets it for a single second. (Page 3 of 4) “I know I’ve always got that in my pocket,” he says. “I’ve already done the real-world stuff. But eight hours a day in front of a computer isn’t that exciting to me right now. Hockey is.” Players don’t get rich. The average ECHL player’s salary is $525 a week. But with free housing, a per diem for food on the road, and one or two days off a week, it’s a nice gig. The pro athletes make friends quickly. There are parties — there are women — and there are stories they won’t tell. “We have a good following here,” Reynolds says. “People will notice you on the street and talk to you. Greenville is nice and clean; it reminds me of Canada.” It also reminds Reynolds and his teammates of all the other guys they’ve every played with all the way back to midget hockey where everyone dreamed of playing the game professionally. “Maybe .001 percent of players ever get to play in the pros,” Perkins says. “My first year in the league, there were probably 70 or 80 guys on the team throughout the year” (rotating through the 20-man roster). “You can have one bad game, or two bad games, and you’re out of there,” Reynolds says. “It’s the name of the game.” Like the others, Hince says he dreamed of playing hockey since he was 3. To give it up now would be nearly impossible. He recalls being a little depressed one day and lamenting being away from home. “And my coach said to me, and I can remember his words exactly,” Hince says, “ ‘You’ve got a friend back home who’s having his best day, and you’re having your worst day, and yet he’d give anything to trade with you.’ ” NHL dreams There’s a lot of free timefor professional athletes. During the 72-game season there are days off, and there is the almost four-month off-season. When there’s no game, practice only takes about two hours. Weekday games usually start at 7 p.m., so there’s an entire day to kill. They hang out in Greenville. They play video games. They gladly do appearances on behalf of the team. They pretty much kill time until they get back on the ice. (Page 4 of 4) But they also have time to think. Hince has enjoyed a seven-year relationship with the same woman who is back home in Kapukasing, Ontario. In the off-season, he works with her dad building custom homes. “I know that’s what I’m going to end up doing,” he says. “And there’s a lot more money in that.” Reynolds knows at age 30 he has to think about his future, too. He has been approached about coaching. “But what I want more than anything is stability,” he says. “The appeal of stability, a 9-to-5 job, a house and weekends off, that’s going to be nice.” All of the guys admit they’ve lost girlfriends who, given other circumstances, might have become wives. “I’ve met a few girls,” Reynolds says, “that I would have gotten serious with if I had stability. So coaching is out for me because it will be the same life. When this is over, it’s over.” The few married guys have their wives with them, living part of the year wherever there’s hockey to be played and in the off-season scrambling to pick up some extra money. That often means teachi...

For Road Warriors, life means long trips, frequent changes - Greenville News

Sun, Jan 22, 2012
Perkins says, “and play the game I love.” Reynolds is in his second year with the Road Warriors, and he’s dreamed of being a pro hockey player since he was a toddler in Kitchener, Ontario. “I’d be playing in the backyard rink and wouldn’t come in the house.” Cornelius is one of the few college graduates on this team of 20-somethings. He has a degree from Iowa State University in engineering. In fact, he worked while going to school and playing hockey. He’s actually losing money by playing, not that he regrets it for a single second. (Page 3 of 4) “I know I’ve always got that in my pocket,” he says. “I’ve already done the real-world stuff. But eight hours a day in front of a computer isn’t that exciting to me right now. Hockey is.” Players don’t get rich. The average ECHL player’s salary is $525 a week. But with free housing, a per diem for food on the road, and one or two days off a week, it’s a nice gig. The pro athletes make friends quickly. There are parties — there are women — and there are stories they won’t tell. “We have a good following here,” Reynolds says. “People will notice you on the street and talk to you. Greenville is nice and clean; it reminds me of Canada.” It also reminds Reynolds and his teammates of all the other guys they’ve every played with all the way back to midget hockey where everyone dreamed of playing the game professionally. “Maybe .001 percent of players ever get to play in the pros,” Perkins says. “My first year in the league, there were probably 70 or 80 guys on the team throughout the year” (rotating through the 20-man roster). “You can have one bad game, or two bad games, and you’re out of there,” Reynolds says. “It’s the name of the game.” Like the others, Hince says he dreamed of playing hockey since he was 3. To give it up now would be nearly impossible. He recalls being a little depressed one day and lamenting being away from home. “And my coach said to me, and I can remember his words exactly,” Hince says, “ ‘You’ve got a friend back home who’s having his best day, and you’re having your worst day, and yet he’d give anything to trade with you.’ ” NHL dreams There’s a lot of free timefor professional athletes. During the 72-game season there are days off, and there is the almost four-month off-season. When there’s no game, practice only takes about two hours. Weekday games usually start at 7 p.m., so there’s an entire day to kill. They hang out in Greenville. They play video games. They gladly do appearances on behalf of the team. They pretty much kill time until they get back on the ice. (Page 4 of 4) But they also have time to think. Hince has enjoyed a seven-year relationship with the same woman who is back home in Kapukasing, Ontario. In the off-season, he works with her dad building custom homes. “I know that’s what I’m going to end up doing,” he says. “And there’s a lot more money in that.” Reynolds knows at age 30 he has to think about his future, too. He has been approached about coaching. “But what I want more than anything is stability,” he says. “The appeal of stability, a 9-to-5 job, a house and weekends off, that’s going to be nice.” All of the guys admit they’ve lost girlfriends who, given other circumstances, might have become wives. “I’ve met a few girls,” Reynolds says, “that I would have gotten serious with if I had stability. So coaching is out for me because it will be the same life. When this is over, it’s over.” The few married guys have their wives with them, living part of the year wherever there’s hockey to be played and in the off-season scrambling to pick up some extra money. That often means teachi...

Rae touts signs of federal Liberal party's revival on eve of convention - Winnipeg Free Press

Sun, Jan 15, 2012
P, which supplanted the Liberals as official Opposition. But they've recently begun going after Rae and his record of racking up debt and increasing spending during a turbulent term as NDP premier of Ontario from 1990 to 1995, when the province was sunk in a crippling recession. Rae said he takes the "pot shots" as another sign of the Liberals' revival. And he offered a spirited and lengthy defence of his record as premier, which some observers took as a sign that Rae intends to run to become the Liberals' permanent leader, despite having explicitly promised not to do so as a condition of being named to the interim role. "Listen up, Mr. Harper. While spending in Ontario increased by about 15 per cent under the Rae government over four budgets, (Finance Minister) Jim Flaherty's first four budgets increased program spending in Canada by close to 40 per cent. So I was a piker compared to Jim Flaherty and Stephen Harper," Rae said in his speech to caucus. Speaking to reporters later, Rae said he was simply defending himself, refusing to "let the Conservatives define who I am." He scoffed at suggestions his speech heralded the unofficial start of his campaign for permanent leader. "There's a lot of idle speculation about this. Every time I show signs of life, people say I'm running for the leadership," he said. "I'm just doing my job as interim leader." Rae said it's up to the party's executive to decide whether to lift the prohibition against the interim leader seeking the permanent post. He said he has no intention of asking the executive to do so. "I'm not asking anybody to do anything. Let me be very clear. I'm following the rules. I'm doing my job. ... I'm having a good time. I have no other plans beyond that." There's likely to be much chatter among delegates to this weekend's convention about whether Rae should be allowed to seek the permanent leadership in a contest slated for the spring of 2013. However, the matter is only peripherally on the agenda and will not be resolved at the convention. Convention delegates will elect eight new members of the 33-member national executive who will eventually have a say in the matter. Four of the five presidential candidates are in agreement that Rae should be not be barred from running, although he would have to step down as interim leader once the contest gets under way. Rae also weighed in Wednesday on several policy resolutions that will be debated by convention delegates. He said he doesn't think a Young Liberal resolution calling for an end to the monarchy in Canada is wise, noting that it would require a constitutional amendment unanimously approved by the provinces. He appeared more open to another youth resolution calling for legalization of marijuana. While he said it's up to delegates to decide, Rae reiterated his argument that the war on drugs has been a failure. He said he hopes the party will be open to electoral reform. But he was non-committal about a resolution calling on the party to support replacing the current first-past-the-post electoral system with a preferential ballot, which would result in electing only those MPs able to amass more than 50 per cent of the vote in their ridings.

Warriors' Hince is truck stop treasure - Greenville News

Wed, Jan 11, 2012
I’m not too fond of. To get a chance to play for Greenville was great, and I accepted right away.” (Page 2 of 2) Many of his new teammates were asleep when the Kapuskasing, Ontario, native got on the Road Warriors’ bus. “We stopped at a Cracker Barrel somewhere in Lexington (Ky.) -- I’m not too sure. We woke up, we were eating breakfast and I met a couple of guys who were sitting with me at the table. “Everybody’s kind of saying, ‘Who’s this new guy?’ ” “Some guys were talking how we had picked up a guy on the bus trip at night and they were having breakfast with him,” said Brandon Wong, a Road Warriors forward. “I hadn’t even seen him yet. I met him that next morning. “He’s stepped in and he’s working hard,” Wong said. “He’s focused and he’s shown that he wants to be here. Hats off to him; he’s playing well right now.” Hince said he didn’t receive much personalized attention from Stork prior to his ECHL debut. “Actually he just kind of threw me in there,” Hince said. “He just did his regular video like he does prior to games -- working on systems and what-not. I just jumped on the pregame skate and the next thing I was playing in the game.” Hince stopped 22 of 24 shots as the Road Warriors beat Chicago in overtime, 3-2, on Dec. 31. He followed that with 27 saves in a 4-1 victory at Toledo on Saturday. “It was pretty neat being in Chicago playing,” Hince said. “And in Toledo I actually had some family down there. “It was good to get the win down there and see them for a couple of minutes after the game.” Missiaen rejoined the team between Hince’s starts, giving Stork two options in net. So, how much difference is there between the SPHL and the ECHL? “I’d like to say it’s completely different, but it’s not,” Hince said. “It’s just the next level higher -- crisper passes, better plays, better players, better shots, better officiating. “For the goalie it’s just reading plays. It makes it a lot easier when you’ve got better players in front of you to read those plays and not have to scramble as much as you do at the lower level.” ...

Thurmon Smith - Sturgis Journal

Thu, Dec 29, 2011
Smith will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at the funeral home. Pastor Ken Beverly of the Church of the True God in South Milford, Ind., will officiate. A graveside committal will follow the service at Ontario Cemetery in Ontario, Ind. Full military honors will be conferred by Captain John J. Kelley Post #1355 VFW and the U.S. Army Honor Guard. The family suggests those wishing to make a memorial donation in Mr. Smith’s memory consider the American Cancer Society, 1400 West Milham, Kalamazoo, MI 49024, the American Heart Association, 3816 Paysphere Circle, Chicago, IL 60674 or the American Diabetes Association, P.O. Box 11454, Alexandria, VA 22312. His obituary is also at www.hackmanfamilyfuneralhome.com, where personal messages of support may be left for the family.   ...

Ernest J. DeLap

Wed, Dec 7, 2011
Ralph Witt and Orlando Lee. A visitation will take place from 1 to 2 p.m. with funeral services at 2 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011, at Brush Creek Lutheran Church, E11765 Omlet Road, Ontario, Wis., followed by burial at Brush Creek Church Cemetery. Refreshments will be offered after services Memorial donations may be made to the Brush Creek Lutheran Church Cemetery’s perpetual care fund. Cremation rites have been accorded. Online condolences may be submitted to www.sunsetfhmemgardens.com. (La Crosse Tribune)




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