Funeral Homes in BORING

online funeral home guide
funeral home, cemeteries
 

send sympathy flowers and gifts

        #  Funeral Flowers
        #  Sympathy Flowers
        Archives  Death Certificates
        #  Obituary Search

Funeral Home Search
 
  Funeral Home Name:

  State:
-- OR --
   Zip:
  All Listings Within:
  
   


Funeral Guide

 


 

 

 

 

 

Funeral Homes > Oregon > Boring

Boring, OR  Funeral Homes

The following funeral service provider list is in Boring, Oregon. Please select a funeral home listing below to view more details about local services provided.
 
Show your respect and express condolences by sending beautiful flowers to celebrate a life well lived. Ordering flowers is quick and easy. Click on the link on the right of a listing and choose an appropriate flower arrangement.

Send Sympathy Flowers to any Funeral Home in Boring, Oregon

Cornerstone Funeral Services and Cremation
18625 Southeast Bakers Ferry Road
Boring , OR 97009
(503) 637-5020
Send Funeral Flowers to Cornerstone Funeral Services and Cremation
Send Flowers to Cornerstone Funeral Services and Cremation

Send Sympathy Flowers to any Funeral Home in Boring, Oregon


Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Memphis planners, public working through UDC changes - Memphis Commercial Appeal

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
I was told this week that there may be some disagreement over a few of these," Whitehead said in an e-mail. He argues the items he's proposing to add are so minor that they don't affect neighboring property owners. His proposal to allow some uses that are prohibited as nonconforming by the current UDC. "... Such as many of the once-acceptable uses in the industrial districts (that are) now prohibited," he said. "... For instance, the UDC use chart no longer permits office buildings in the Heavy Industrial district. So, we just made it even more difficult to revitalize office buildings like the ones you find around the airport or along New Getwell." Ray Brown, an architect and urban planner who has been active with the Stakeholders Group, identified another unresolved issue: public notification when changes are proposed for the UDC. He said one amendment requires only "minimum notice" to the public. "While there are practical reasons not to open the entire code to citizen amendment in what could become a long series of contentious meetings, some members of our group believe that OPD needs to establish a more transparent amendment process," Brown wrote in an e-mail. But Brown praised Whitehead's spirit of cooperation and predicted consensus will be reached on almost all the remaining issues. Code alert What: Public hearing on proposed changes to the Unified Development Code. When: 6-8 p.m. Wednesday Where: Circuit Playhouse, 51 S. Cooper -- Tom Bailey Jr.: (901) 529-2388 ...

El Paso boxing match draws crowd despite fears of violence - Los Angeles Times

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
José Aguino told Fox News. The crowd at the stadium, which is about 500 yards from the border, included a good number of "Juarenses," Mexican residents of neighboring Ciudad Juarez who came to cheer for Chavez, a Sinaloa native and son of the legendary boxer. Enrique López, a UTEP commuter student, waved a Mexican flag with his friends in the stands. “He’s the son of a legend, Julio César Chávez.” López told Fox News. “I followed him since I was little.” In the end, Chavez fans were rewarded: He won the fight in the seventh round.    ...

Cudahy arrests add salt to LA County area's civic wounds - Los Angeles Times

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
The South Gate scandal also made national headlines and sparked cries for reform, but it didn't appear to put a scare into leaders in neighboring towns. Former Assemblyman Hector De La Torre, who was on the South Gate council then, believes the relative dearth of economic opportunities in the private sector in southeast L.A. County drove some ambitious people to pursue careers in local government. Most seem ethical, he said. But not all. "There's that saying: Why rob banks? Because that's where the money is," he said. "Well, why get into government? Because that's where the money is in some of these communities." De La Torre said the concept of public service is often a secondary consideration, if it is considered at all.

Enquirer editor explains new subscription model - Cincinnati.com

Fri, Feb 24, 2012
To be with the Reds and Bengals and UC and Xavier virtually every day, game or no game. To cover more than 70 communities in our region, every day. To methodically track and read boring but important documents and budgets. To get to know the decision makers and understand their personalities and motivations and relationships. (Page 2 of 2) We do this work so you don’t have to. You can watch city council meetings on public access TV but most of you don’t. And even if you did, that often is not where the real news happens. We are there when you aren’t, we are where the news happens. Reliably and consistently, for you. Even when you could get information elsewhere, we help you get it easier or faster. You can go to cincinnati.com to find a fish fry. Well, you can do some of that through word of mouth or a flier at church. Or you can can see dozens using our interactive map. You can find things to do this weekend in a lot of places. But if you don’t want to miss music that Janelle Gelfand knows or the new restaurant that Polly Campbell knows or you want to see many more options than your usual choices, cincinnati.com’s entertainment section is packed. Here are key points about how this will work: • Your subscription will always include full access to the web, mobile site, iPhone and Android apps, a tablet product and the e-newspaper, which is an exact replica of the print newspaper that you can page through online. • The home page, section fronts, obituaries and classified sections like cars.com will remain free. • You can read a limited number of articles for free before you are asked to subscribe. That doesn’t charge the infrequent reader but does ask regular readers to pay. I know we must give you important, unique content that helps you speak up to your elected officials, know how school changes will affect your kids, plan your weekend and participate in efforts to improve quality of life in your neighborhood. We are balance that with inspiring and beautiful stories and photography. I think that’s worth paying for. Let me know when you see us do something you value, to help us keep doing it. And let me know what else you need from us.

Enquirer editor explains new subscription model - Cincinnati.com

Fri, Feb 24, 2012
To be with the Reds and Bengals and UC and Xavier virtually every day, game or no game. To cover more than 70 communities in our region, every day. To methodically track and read boring but important documents and budgets. To get to know the decision makers and understand their personalities and motivations and relationships. (Page 2 of 2) We do this work so you don’t have to. You can watch city council meetings on public access TV but most of you don’t. And even if you did, that often is not where the real news happens. We are there when you aren’t, we are where the news happens. Reliably and consistently, for you. Even when you could get information elsewhere, we help you get it easier or faster. You can go to cincinnati.com to find a fish fry. Well, you can do some of that through word of mouth or a flier at church. Or you can can see dozens using our interactive map. You can find things to do this weekend in a lot of places. But if you don’t want to miss music that Janelle Gelfand knows or the new restaurant that Polly Campbell knows or you want to see many more options than your usual choices, cincinnati.com’s entertainment section is packed. Here are key points about how this will work: • Your subscription will always include full access to the web, mobile site, iPhone and Android apps, a tablet product and the e-newspaper, which is an exact replica of the print newspaper that you can page through online. • The home page, section fronts, obituaries and classified sections like cars.com will remain free. • You can read a limited number of articles for free before you are asked to subscribe. That doesn’t charge the infrequent reader but does ask regular readers to pay. I know we must give you important, unique content that helps you speak up to your elected officials, know how school changes will affect your kids, plan your weekend and participate in efforts to improve quality of life in your neighborhood. We balance that with inspiring and beautiful stories and photography. I think that’s worth paying for. Let me know when you see us do something you value, to help us keep doing it. And let me know what else you need from us.

Works by Clancy, Barry, Weir and Grisey - Musical Criticism

Fri, Feb 17, 2012
I’ve always been fond of grey fugues and exercises,' he writes, 'as well as all kinds of trash, and still play boring exam pieces with pleasure.' Feldman's Sixpenny Editions is exuberant and bizarre, its eight movements traversing a dusty terrain the art music tradition left behind. The first movement, 'Martial Steps', makes a trite tonal verse move up and up by semitones before abruptly stopping. The second, 'Home Thoughts', is a galloping discordant piano solo, played brilliantly here. And the last movement, 'The Innermost Secret', wistfully recalls lunches Satie took with Debussy, of which Satie said Debussy cooked pork chops 'with the innermost secret.' The second half of the concert was taken up by Gérard Grisey's Quartre chants pour franchir le seuil. First performed by the London Sinfonietta under George Benjamin in 1999, this song cycle, which sets texts from different civilisations on the different guises taken by death, was the last work Grisey completed before his own untimely death. For those who still believe in masterworks, it is certainly a masterwork of late twentieth century Western art music. It is also difficult to pull off, featuring an unusual ensemble, extended techniques, and unorthodox ensemble writing. Though the BCMG and Narucki fell short here and there, by and large the piece came across well, growing particularly strong in its latter stages. 'La mort de l'ange', the first movement, floated into view, its hushed falling intervals passing round the ensemble with a feeling of weightlessness, mimicking the fall of the titular angel. The work's climax, though, was too abrupt in coming in Clement Power's reading, and the movement's overall shape was a bit lost in the process. 'La mort de la civilisation' pushed brooding harmonies around the stage, which gradually intensified over the movement's duration, the ensemble sounding collectively like an accordion or resonant percussion instrument, each phrase driven by double bass or harp ostinati. The visionary, cinematic quality of the music came across well – an atmosphere settled over the hall, and it was hard not to be transported. A particular standout was the final chant 'La mort de l'humanité', an apocalyptic imagining of a great flood taken from the Epic of Gilgamesh. Ushered in by a solo section for the three percussionists, between them charged with a battery of percussive resources including gongs, steel drums, bass drums, bongos and marimba, they gradually ratcheted up the tension, bass drums hitting thunder-strikes, until the ensemble entered in weird waves of shrill chords, and Narucki wailed with awful passion. After the storm, the calm of the final Berceuse, a lullaby for the newly opened world, felt lucid and beautiful. The harmonies – or timbres, since Grisey's writing, making sound a wash, blurs the two – were astounding. Though Narucki's French diction was unclear, her delivery otherwise was strong. It's a shame to have to end the review on a negative note, but it has to be said: the trombonist, prominent in the centre of the stage, spent the last two movements distractingly yawning, laughing, sprawling his legs, playing with his fingers, rolling his eyes, and generally doing his best to communicate to the audience his dislike of the piece – quite unprofessional. By Liam Cagney Photo Credits: Sean Clancy by Alan Moore Related articles: Concert review: Grisey's Les espaces acoustiquesCD review: Grisey's Le temps et l'écume (Kairos)Concert review: Erg...

It's Girl Scout cookie time again - Greenville News

Wed, Feb 8, 2012
Edy’s Girl Scout cookie flavors). They’re not too concerned about their tallies. After all, they’re not selling vacuum cleaners. “Who would want a vacuum?” Ashley says, scrunching her face. “They’re boring. People love cookies.” ...

Leslie 'Les' Clinton Drew

Tue, Jan 31, 2012
Greenfield, Kate and Emily Leven, Alex and Grace Torres, Christine, Robbie and Katie Moore and Gianna Drew.His friends and students said Les was such a handsome man, intelligent and charming, never boring, never dull, so controversial, and so entertaining.  Les was known for his “dry” sense of humor.  When with Les, one never quite knew what to expect.  His private spider collection holds several thousand spiders, from rare, small, large, to common, (all dead, of course) and a vast collection of journals of arachnology.  Les also had a large library of over 1,000 books.  If he was here, he could tell you about them all.At his request, cremation has taken place and a celebration of his life will be held at a later date.Memorials are suggested to the charity of the donor’s choice.Creel Funeral Home is assisting the family with arrangements. (Lewistown News-Argus)

Love of jazz was Linn Hudson's bottom line

Thu, Jan 26, 2012
Europe for two weeks," said his son, John Evans Hudson of Suwanee, Ga. "He was an accountant, and you'd think, 'Boring, boring, boring,' but he was just a neat guy and a strong supporter of Memphis music." Linn Hudson, 87, of Memphis, died Friday. He was the retired chief financial officer of Century Management Co. of Memphis, which holds multiple McDonald's restaurant franchises across the Mid-South. Born in Indianapolis, Hudson grew up on a farm in Paris Crossing, Ind. He worked in an ordnance factory during World War II while earning a bachelor's degree from Butler University. He came to Memphis in 1955 when ... (The Commercial Appeal)

Kenneth “Ken” Gale Luckenbill

Sun, Jan 22, 2012
Holly Hesselgrave and husband Brad, Zachary Goodin and wife Spring, and Josiah Goodin and fiancée Nikki; brother Ron Luckenbill and wife Debbie of Salem; and four sisters, Barbara Rennó of Boring, and Normadine Kirkpatrick and husband Elis, LeeAnn Raymond and husband Glen, and Beverly Glenn and husband Walt, all of Bend. Ken has numerous nieces, nephews, cousins and dear friends. He was loved by many and will be missed by all. Ken’s celebration of life will be at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 28, at Valley Christian Center, 577 Scravel Hill Road N.E., Albany. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Mighty Oaks Children’s Therapy Center in Albany. (Albany Democrat-Herald)




Fresh Flowers

Featured Funeral Homes

Loveland Funeral Chapel
1508 4th Street
La Grande , OR 97850

Mountain View Cemetery
500 Hilda St
Oregon City , OR 97045

Hillcrest Memorial Park
715 West Main Street
Medford , OR 97501

Milton Freewater Cemetery Maintenance District 3
Cemetery Road
Milton Freewater , OR

Waverly Memorial Cemetary
Old Salem Road Northeast
Albany , OR 97321