Crumpler Honeycutt Funeral Home

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Funeral Homes > North Carolina > Clinton > Crumpler Honeycutt Funeral Home

Crumpler Honeycutt Funeral Home

Crumpler Honeycutt Funeral Home
118 Fayetteville Street
Clinton, NC 28328
Phone: (910) 592-2066
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Guitar picking master Doc Watson dies at 89 - LubbockOnline.com

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Call him Doc!” Seven of his albums won Grammy awards; his eighth Grammy was a lifetime achievement award in 2004. He also received the National Medal of the Arts from President Bill Clinton in 1997. “There may not be a serious, committed baby boomer alive who didn’t at some point in his or her youth try to spend a few minutes at least trying to learn to pick a guitar like Doc Watson,” Clinton said at the time. Folklore described Watson as “a powerful singer and a tremendously influential picker who virtually invented the art of playing mountain fiddle tunes on the flattop guitar.” Countless guitarists have tried to emulate Watson’s renditions of songs such as “Tennessee Stud,” ‘’Shady Grove,” and “Deep River Blues.” Doc Watson’s son Merle began recording and touring with him in 1964. But Merle Watson died at age 36 in a 1985 tractor accident, sending his father into deep grief and making him consider retirement. Instead, he kept playing and started Merlefest, an annual musical event in Wilkesboro, N.C., that raises money for a community college there and celebrates “traditional plus” music. “When Merle and I started out we called our music ‘traditional plus,’ meaning the traditional music of the Appalachian region plus whatever other styles we were in the mood to play,” Doc Watson is quoted as saying on the festival’s website. “Since the beginning, the people of the college and I have agreed that the music of MerleFest is ‘traditional plus.’” Doc Watson has said that when Merle died, he lost the best friend he would ever have. He also relied on his wife, Rosa Lee, whom he married in 1947. “She saw what little good there was in me, and there was little,” Watson told the AP in 2000. “I’m awful glad she cared about me, and I’m awful glad she married me.” In a PBS NewsHour interview before a January appearance in Arlington, Va., Watson recalled his father teaching him how to play harmonica to a tune his parents had sung in church, as well as his first bus trip to New York City to perform in the early 1960s. He gave an early solo performance at Gerde’s Folk City in Greenwich Village, a hot spot for the folk music revival, and later played Carnegie Hall. Telling the stories in a folksy manner, he broke into a quiet laugh at various points. He said he still enjoyed touring. “I love music and love a good audience and still have to make a living,” Watson said. “Why would I quit?” Musician Sam Bush, who has performed at every Merlefest, began touring with Doc and Merle Watson in 1974, occasionally substituting for Merle when he couldn’t travel. “I would sit next to Doc, and I would be influenced by his incredible timing and taste,” Bush said after Watson’s recent surgery. “He seems to always know what notes to play. They’re always the perfect notes. He helped me learn the space between the notes (are) as valuable as the ones you play.” Bush said he was also intimidated when he began playing with the man he calls “the godfather of all flatpickers.” “But Doc puts you at ease about that kind of stuff,” Bush said. “I never met a more generous kind of musician. He is more about the musical communication than showing off with hot licks.” His blindness didn’t hold him back musically or at home. Joe Newberry, a musician and spokesman for the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources, remembered once when his wife called the Watson home. Rosa Lee Watson said her husband was on the roof, replacing shingles. His daughter Nancy Watson said her father built the family’s utility shed. Guitarist ...

George K. McKinney, U.S. marshal - Baltimore Sun

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
In 1995, President Bill Clinton appointed Mr. McKinney as U.S. marshal for Maryland, the first African-American to hold that position in the state since the founding of the U.S. Marshal Service in 1789."I think it says a lot about the district of Maryland and the country," Mr. McKinney said at the time. "Minority marshals are relatively new. But it's something I've aspired to ever since I was a deputy. I wanted to be in the top job."In the wake of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, the U.S. Marshal Service for the District of Maryland was directed by the U.S. attorney general to "assume and manage all security operations" at BWI-Thurgood Marshall Airport, his daughter said.The airport remained under Mr. McKinney's purview for 60 days until it was taken over by the Maryland National Guard and then the Transportation Security Administration.

Albert J. Thompson Jr., honored NFTA bus driver

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Mattie M. Lewis; and three daughters, Edmonia D. Watkins, Pamela T. Sharpe and Yvonne D. Askew. Services will be held at noon Monday in New Covenant United Church of Christ, 459 Clinton St., with a wake at 9:30. (The Buffalo News)

Patience pays off for Wade Hampton girls - Greenville News

Tue, Mar 6, 2012
U. They’re having fun, they’re enjoying it, it’s a good culture, so it’s a possibility.’” A little more than three months later, the Generals were at the Bi-Lo Center, in the state semifinals against Clinton and -- after a few early jitters -- feeling at home. “Once we got into the flow, it was just business as normal,” Linderman said. “It could have been on Wade Hampton’s court, it could have been on anyone’s court. We felt comfortable, and we felt prepared.” ...

*UPDATE* A Rolling Stone Gathers No Facts - NorthcentralPa.com

Tue, Mar 6, 2012
International Business Times characterized EPA administrator Lisa Jackson as striking a “bullish tone” on the safety of fracturing at a forum in New Jersey. And just this week, President Clinton, himself up for a Nobel Prize, said the country needed to end its “ambivalence” over clean-burning natural gas, judging it a clear winner for our country. New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg followed that up with his own positive comments, suggesting that “with appropriate safeguards, I think fracking is something that on balance is better for this country.” Against this backdrop, as serious people continue to cite serious evidence in support of the proposition of responsible development, a fundamentally unserious account of the current debate was posted this week on the website of Rolling Stone magazine. Coming in at 6,200 words on the dot, the piece can most charitably be described as a not-so-quick (but plenty dirty) rehash of previously debunked charges and talking points, offered up by the same usual cast of characters that’s frequently wheeled-out and introduced anew any time a hit-piece is in the offing. But in the end, the story fails not because its original reporting is bad, though it is. It fails because nothing resembling original reporting can be found anywhere in it. According to an item posted on Friday by John Hanger, former Pennsylvania DEP secretary and CEO of PennFuture, a leading environmental group: “[Rolling Stone’s] Jeff Goodell … should split his pay with the NYT gas reporter, because Goodell regurgitates all the NYT’s greatest gas hits, including ones that the NYT public editor found to be misleading or false.” Below, we take a look at some of the more obvious errors that contributed to what, in the end, was a pretty ridiculous piece. – Rolling Stone: “Fracking, it turns out, is about producing cheap energy the same way the mortgage crisis was about helping realize the dreams of middle-class homeowners.” Federal Reserve economist: “Natural gas prices that slumped to a 10-year low this month could save U.S. consumers $16.5 billion on home energy bills over the course of a year, according to a senior economist at the U.S. Federal Reserve. U.S. households might see total savings from lower gas prices of as much as $113 billion a year through 2015, including tack-on effects such as lower product prices and higher wages generated by cheaper fuel.” (Bloomberg, Jan. 25, 2012) IHS CERA: “If shale gas had not radically changed the picture beginning in 2007, ...

*UPDATE* A Rolling Stone Gathers No Facts - NorthcentralPa.com

Tue, Mar 6, 2012
International Business Times characterized EPA administrator Lisa Jackson as striking a “bullish tone” on the safety of fracturing at a forum in New Jersey. And just this week, President Clinton, himself up for a Nobel Prize, said the country needed to end its “ambivalence” over clean-burning natural gas, judging it a clear winner for our country. New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg followed that up with his own positive comments, suggesting that “with appropriate safeguards, I think fracking is something that on balance is better for this country.” Against this backdrop, as serious people continue to cite serious evidence in support of the proposition of responsible development, a fundamentally unserious account of the current debate was posted this week on the website of Rolling Stone magazine. Coming in at 6,200 words on the dot, the piece can most charitably be described as a not-so-quick (but plenty dirty) rehash of previously debunked charges and talking points, offered up by the same usual cast of characters that’s frequently wheeled-out and introduced anew any time a hit-piece is in the offing. But in the end, the story fails not because its original reporting is bad, though it is. It fails because nothing resembling original reporting can be found anywhere in it. According to an item posted on Friday by John Hanger, former Pennsylvania DEP secretary and CEO of PennFuture, a leading environmental group: “[Rolling Stone’s] Jeff Goodell … should split his pay with the NYT gas reporter, because Goodell regurgitates all the NYT’s greatest gas hits, including ones that the NYT public editor found to be misleading or false.” Below, we take a look at some of the more obvious errors that contributed to what, in the end, was a pretty ridiculous piece. – Rolling Stone: “Fracking, it turns out, is about producing cheap energy the same way the mortgage crisis was about helping realize the dreams of middle-class homeowners.” Federal Reserve economist: “Natural gas prices that slumped to a 10-year low this month could save U.S. consumers $16.5 billion on home energy bills over the course of a year, according to a senior economist at the U.S. Federal Reserve. U.S. households might see total savings from lower gas prices of as much as $113 billion a year through 2015, including tack-on effects such as lower product prices and higher wages generated by cheaper fuel.” (Bloomberg, Jan. 25, 2012) IHS CERA: “If shale gas had not radically changed the picture beginning in 2007, ...

Lucile Hunt Proctor - St. George Daily Spectrum

Wed, Feb 29, 2012
UT, Allen and Leonie, Blanding, UT. Sisters, Mary Ann and Sid Atkin, St. George, Evaline and Marvin Bracken, Beryl, UT. She was preceded in death by her husband, her parents, brothers David, Clinton, Tommy, Richard, and sister, Elsa. Funeral services will be held at 12:00 p.m. on Monday, February 20, 2012 at the Panguitch LDS 2nd Ward Chapel, 200 North 400 East, Panguitch, Utah. A visitation will be held Monday, prior to services, from 10:00 a.m. to 11:45 a.m. at the Chapel. Interment will be at the Panguitch City Cemetery. Friends may visit with Lucile’s family at her home on Sunday evening. Arrangements entrusted to the care of Metcalf Mortuary, (435) 673-4221. Please visit our website at www.metcalfmortuary.com for condolences, complete obituary and funeral listings.

Saturday's High School Results - Greenville News

Sun, Feb 26, 2012
Wilson 4, Benjamin 3. Records: Newberry 25-3, LC 21-4. Lower State North Charleston 66, Marion 55 Upper State Great Falls 49, Landrum 44 Lower State Johnsonville 54, Burke 52 Wade Hampton 51, Clinton 33 WADE HAMPTON (51): Tatum 4, Nikki Young 21, Spry 6, Dillard 9, Malphrus 4, Winiski 3, Bailey 2, Lineberger 2. CLINTON (33): Gabby Bates 10, Simpson 4, Tallman 5, Kiley Frazier 11, I. Kinard 3. Half: WH 27-13. Records: WH 27-1, Clinton 20-7. Lower State Dreher 53, Lower Richland 43 Upper State Columbia 43, Keenan 36 Lower State Bishop England 61, Lake City 50 Upper State Abbeville 54, Denmark-Olar 51 Lower State Timmonsville 56, C.E. Murray 36 BASEBALL Blue Ridge 11, Berea 4 WP: Rider (1-0). Hitters: Wheeler (BR) 2-4, 2 2B; Lancaster (BR) 2-3; Coster (BR) 2B. Records: BR 1-0, Berea 0-1. WRESTLING STATE INDIVIDUAL MEET At Civic Center of Anderson CLASS AAAA 106 – 1. Jackson Myers (Lexington), 2. Alex Roberts (Hillcrest), 3. James Sass (Summerville), 4. Devon Faile (Rock Hill) 113 – ...

Whitney Houston voice of post-civil rights era - CBS News

Fri, Feb 17, 2012
Clive Davis's golden girl at the 1989 "Soul Train" Awards. Less than enamored with her brand of smoky adult contemporary balladry and buoyant synth pop, black popular culture would wait until the Clinton '90s, would wait through "The Bodyguard" tsunami to embrace Cissy's daughter wholeheartedly and with open arms as she eased her way into an R&B universe transformed by hip hop and Terry McMillan novels. The reconstructed Whitney who "exhaled" and told her man that "it's not right, but it's okay," had found a way to wed a little bit of Newark, New Jersey, swagger with diva elegance and gospel conviction. Slipping effortlessly into Chaka's "everywoman" shoes, she stepped into the decade in which black popular culture most fully became global popular culture and musically asserted her breezy mastery of dance pop, hip hop soul and Wyclef Jean-diaspora carnival. The Whitney of the '90s was an Afro-pop cosmopolitan whose voice, at turns astonishingly supple and formidable, sinuous and striking, evoked an increasing fullness, warm sophistication and playful maturity -- all the more heartbreakingly ironic given the ways that her personal life began to come undone at that time. Drawn as some may be to the tales told by gossip folk coming out in droves, the more compelling story of Whitney Houston resides in a voice that raises above the din of US magazine and E! network chatter and holds for us the history of post-civil rights era womanhood as it defiantly, regally and audaciously weaves its way through a world of both legislated racial equality and lingering systemic discrimination. Even in that most iconic of moments, the 1991 Superbowl "Star-Spangled Banner" performance, the woman with the imposing three-octave range would complicate the fraught symbolic meaning of that patriotic ritual by virtue of her sheer vocal power.

Squeeze the Day for Feb. 3 - Cincinnati CityBeat

Fri, Feb 17, 2012
Give Some Love," followed by JC Brooks and Co.'s entertaining music video for "Everything Will Be Fine." This one has "Club Gig of the Year" potential written all over it.• George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic are at Bogart's in Corryville tonight for an all-ages, 9 p.m. show. What to say about George other than he is the living embodiment of Funk. (Click here for a more effusive preview.) Clinton recently stopped by Indy on his way to Cincinnati to partake in some of the pre-Super Bowl activities. Check out his very recent interview with MTV's Sway where he talks about Don Cornelius, the late founder of Soul Train. (Tickets for tonight's show are $30, plus fees.)Momentous Happenings in Music History for February 3On this day in 2004, 11 years after breaking up, Alternative Rock pioneers Pixies announced they would do a full-scale reunion tour. Though successful during its initial late ’80s/early ’90s run, the band's legacy grew outrageously after splitting, so it seemed only fair that Pixies members would reap some riches from their posthumous fame and enduring influence. But after reportedly raking in $14 million on that first jaunt, the band doesn't seem to be able to stop reunion-touring, doing consistent jaunts ever since. In 2009, Pixies did numerous dates in honor of the 20th anniversary of their Doolittle album. Last fall, the tour was still going as the band performed a month's worth of U.S. dates on its Doolittle/Lost Cities tour (celebrating Doolittle's 22nd anniversary, I suppose).All the while, the band has (mostly) expressed no desire to record a new album. In the seven years Pixies have been a band again, they've released a total of two new songs — the Kim Deal-sung "Bam Thwok" and the below cover of Warren Zevon's "Ain't That Pretty At All," for the Zevon tribute album, Enjoy Every Sandwich.Born This Day: Musical movers and shakers born Feb. 3 include: The Kinks' guitar-playing Davies brother, Dave Davies (1947); Sonic Youth guitarist/occasional vocalist Lee Renaldo (1956); on-again/off-again member of Alt music icons The Cure, Lol Tolhurst (1959); Reggaeton star Daddy Yankee (1977); Jamaican-American Pop star Sean Kingston (1990); and Blues/R&B/Funk singer/songwriter/guitarist Johnny "Guitar" Watson (1935).Watson's name popped up recently in the obituaries of Ett...




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