Funeral Homes in BINGHAMTON

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Funeral Homes > New York > Binghamton

Binghamton, NY  Funeral Homes

The following funeral service provider list is in Binghamton, New York. Please select a funeral home listing below to view more details about local services provided.
 
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AEGIS Cremation Service
234 Clinton Street
Binghamton , NY 13905
(607) 729-5520
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Chase WM R and Son Funeral Directors Binghamton
44 Exchange Street
Binghamton , NY 13901
(607) 724-4867
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Send Flowers to Chase WM R and Son Funeral Directors Binghamton

Chase WM R and Son Funeral Directors Port Dickinson Adm OFC
737 Chenango Street
Binghamton , NY 13901
(607) 772-0320
Send Funeral Flowers to Chase WM R and Son Funeral Directors Port Dickinson Adm OFC
Send Flowers to Chase WM R and Son Funeral Directors Port Dickinson Adm OFC

Chenango Valley Cemetery Association
Nowlan Road
Binghamton , NY 13901
(607) 722-2709
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Send Flowers to Chenango Valley Cemetery Association

Fischer Paul M Funeral Directors
44 Exchange Street
Binghamton , NY 13901
(607) 724-4867
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Obituary: Marsha D. Guzzey, office manager, dies at 58 - Washington Post

Wed, Feb 8, 2012
Prince George’s Community College in 1974. In 1992, she married William Guzzey, from whom she was separated. Survivors include her husband, of Binghamton, N.Y., and daughter Kathryn Guzzey of Silver Spring. — T. Rees Shapiro ...

On Lee Fohl and the Lessons of Cleveland Fandom - Waiting For Next Year

Thu, Jan 26, 2012
Pirates in 1902 and four games with the Cincinnati Reds in 1903 – those five games represent his entire major league playing career. He then bounced around the minors for ten years, playing for the Binghamton Bingoes, Youngstown Ohio Works and Columbus Senators, and acting as player manager for the Lima Cigarmakers, Akron Champs and Akron Rubbermen, winning the pennant each of the four years he was in that role. Near the beginning of his tenure in Akron, an August 1910 editorial in the Akron Beacon Journal said this about Fohl and his squad: It looks like Akron for the pennant this year and the prospect of finishing at or near the top must be doubly sweet to the tribe of Fohl after the almost universal roasting they received from fans earlier in the year. Some of the Akron youngsters seem to have major league possibilities ahead of them. Nothing of the kind is in store for Fohl. While there are dozens of worse catchers holding more or less securely to better jobs, Fohl is veteran enough so that scouts have learned to pass him by. His career seems to be cut out for just what has appeared here, that of a faithful and competent caterer to the minor league fan – somebody to take up the drudgery and responsibility of a backstop’s job, to do the thinking for nine men and the work of two, and to do it every day. After stints with the Huntington Blue Sox and the Waterbury Contenders, Fohl proved the author wrong and made it back to the majors in 1915 – as a coach with the newly-christened Cleveland Indians. About a month into the season, manager Joe Birmingham was ousted and Fohl, who’d been warming up pitchers in the bullpen, was unceremoniously named temporary manager. The Tribe finished seventh (of eight) in the American League that year, a depressing 44.5 games behind the pennant-winning Boston Red Sox. But in his first full year managing the Indians, Fohl seemed to hit his stride. A July 1916 article in The Day described him as a “managerial find”, going on to say, “Despite every obstacle, with a pitching staff of kids shot to pieces, Fohl has rallied his team after every retreat and continues to stick in the thick of the fight.” Things must have fallen off after that, though, as Cleveland finished just sixth in the league that year. The Indians finished third in 1917 and continued to improve into 1918. An article titled ‘Saying Little, Sawing Wood’, dated May 16, 1918, and clipped from a newspaper I can’t identify had this to say about the team and its manager: Hit harder than any other A...

Obituaries William G. Humiston, Vietnam vet, insurance agent

Sun, Jan 22, 2012
William G. Humiston of West Seneca, an Army veteran of the Vietnam War and longtime Allstate insurance agent, died unexpectedly Tuesday in his Florida home. He was 66. Born in Binghamton, Mr. Humiston was a 1963 graduate of Binghamton North High School, where he met his future wife, the former Karen Morley. He also studied at Broome County Technical Institute until 1965 and Rochester Institute of Technology from 1965 to 1967, before being drafted into the Army. He served from 1967 to 1969 and rose to the rank of sergeant, serving in the First Infantry Division. Mr. Humi... (The Buffalo News)

Dr. David Palmerton, longtime family practitioner

Wed, Jan 11, 2012
Dec. 14, 1927—Jan. 10, 2012 Dr. David L. Palmerton, a Cheektowaga physician and father of eight, died Tuesday in Brothers of Mercy nursing home, Clarence, after a long illness. He was 84. Born in Binghamton, he graduated from Geneva High School, earned a bachelor’s degree from Hobart College and a medical degree from the University of Buffalo. He served in the Army in 1946-47. For 44 years, he served as a family physician in private practice, with an office on Harlem Road in Cheektowaga. He also was the physician for Clarence High School in the 1960s and ’70s. He retired in 2003. He and hi... (The Buffalo News)

Dr. David Palmerton, longtime family practitioner

Wed, Jan 11, 2012
Dec. 14, 1927—Jan. 10, 2012 Dr. David L. Palmerton, a Cheektowaga physician and father of eight, died Tuesday in Brothers of Mercy nursing home, Clarence, after a long illness. He was 84. Born in Binghamton, he graduated from Geneva High School, earned a bachelor’s degree from Hobart College and a medical degree from the University of Buffalo. He served in the Army in 1946-47. For 44 years, he served as a family physician in private practice, with an office on Harlem Road in Cheektowaga. He also was the physician for Clarence High School in the 1960s and ’70s. He retired in 2003. He and hi... (The Buffalo News)

Sarkis G. Soghanalian, Arms Dealer, Dies at 82

Thu, Oct 6, 2011
Beirut, where Sarkis quit school and went to work, his daughter, Melo Hansen, said. He married Shirley Adams, a teacher at a school in Beirut, in 1958, and they moved to Binghamton, N.Y., where they lived for a decade before returning to Lebanon. They were divorced in the 1970s. His son said Mr. Soghanalian was fluent in English, French, Armenian, Turkish and Arabic and “could make himself understood” in Spanish and Italian. “There’s been enough said about ‘merchant of death’ and all that,” his son said. “But all the way back to the ’60s and ’70s, his goal was to help the United States. There was a deep-seated root of patriotism that often gets overlooked.” Mr. Soghanalian was a citizen of Lebanon and never took American citizenship, his son said. “He liked to be independent, and it gave the U.S. an element of denial: ‘He’s not one of ours.’ ” In addition to his son, who lives in Miami, and his daughter, who lives in Salt Lake City, Mr. Soghanalian is survived by his sister, Anahis Hartz; his brother, Zaven; three grandchildren; and four great-grandchildren. Despite the wealth his arms sales produced, the end of the cold war cut off many of his business contacts, his son said. “The world changed around him,” Mr. Soghanalian said. By the time of his death, “he was broke.” ... (New York Times)




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