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Angola, NY  Funeral Homes

The following funeral service provider list is in Angola, New York. Please select a funeral home listing below to view more details about local services provided.
 
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Addison Funeral Home Inc
262 North Main Street
Angola , NY 14006
(716) 549-1100
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Jack E. Noel Sr., insurance investigator, volunteer

Sun, Dec 4, 2011
Paul. “He tried to do volunteer work. He was active in church, too. It was just that he wanted to help out.” An avid gardener, Mr. Noel spent time during the spring and summer at Evangola State Park as part of a volunteer group of gardeners that helped care for the park’s gardens and shrubbery. He did that work for about 15 years. He lived a brief time in Rochester, and spent the last 56 years as a resident of Derby. He was a member of veterans’ posts in the Town of Evans. Survivors include his wife of 66 years and his son. A memorial service will be held 11 a. m. Saturday in St. James United Church of Christ, 76 Main St., Hamburg. (The Buffalo News)

LeRoy D. McKale - Sturgis Journal

Thu, Oct 27, 2011
Mr. McKale’s memory consider Post #1355 VFW, 264 W. Fawn River Rd., Sturgis, MI 49091 or the Sturgis Instrumental Music Alumni Association, c/o: Walt Heimstra, 5515 W. Orland Rd., Angola, Ind.,  46703.The obituary is also at www.hackmanfamilyfuneralhome.com where personal messages of support may be left for the family.

Charles T. Henson - Sturgis Journal

Mon, Oct 17, 2011
Carolyn Aldrich of Goshen, Ind.; two brothers, Jerry Dale (Catherine) Henson of Santee, Calif. and Gregory Scott Nolan of Sturgis; sister-in-law and brother-in-law, Karen and Rolland English of Angola, Ind.; and several nieces and nephews that he dearly loved.He was preceded in death by his parents, Walter Lee Henson and Margaret Ruth Nolan; and one brother Robert Jack Henson.The family will receive friends from 10– 10:45 a.m. Wednesday, Oct. 19, at the Hackman Family Funeral Homes – Hackman Chapel, 114 S. Nottawa St., Sturgis, MI 49091, 269-651-2331.  Funeral services celebrating the life of Charles Henson will be held at 11 a.m. Wednesday at the funeral home.  The Rev. Michael Wicks of the First Presbyterian Church in Sturgis will officiate.  Full military honors will be conferred by Captain John J. Kelley Post #1355 VFW and the U.S. Marine Corp Honor Guard.  Cremation will follow the service.  Private placement of the ashes will be in the First Presbyterian Church Columbarium.The family suggests those wishing to make a memorial donation in Mr. Henson’s memory consider the First Presbyterian Church, 1320 S. Lakeview Ave., Sturgis, MI 49091.The obituary is also at www.hackmanfamilyfuneralhome.com where personal messages of support may be left for the family.

Alan Lomax: An Ear For Folk - Swans

Tue, Oct 11, 2011
Kentucky recording black music where they found it. This would be an On the Road intent on the roadside, not on what happened inside the car. They often stopped at prisons. In the penitentiary at Angola in Louisiana they met Huddie Ledbetter, the charismatic "King of the Twelve-String Guitar," and better known as Lead Belly. He was serving time for violent crime. Bidding the Lomaxes goodbye, Lead Belly told them to get him out and he would travel with them as chauffeur and servant. Here began the Lomax-Leadbelly intimacy that would end in imbroglio and furnish another emblematic anecdote of race in America pre-1960s. They made an odd threesome. Up front strode the southern gentleman with his underside of "po' white" prejudice. Then came his liberal, semi-rebellious son tinged with east-coast radicalism. Trailing behind, but sometimes leap-frogging both of them, alternately slouching or prancing, was Huddie Ledbetter, musical genius and veteran of chain gangs. His eyes were on a better life. The Lomaxes returned to Angola in 1934. They recorded a song in which Lead Belly asked the governor for his freedom and left a copy with the prison secretary before driving on. This laid the groundwork of the legend that they had obtained his release. It was a misunderstanding that they never cared to correct. Lead Belly was in fact released a month after their visit, but simply because he had served a sufficient part of his sentence. Once free, Lead Belly couldn't find a job and again asked John Lomax to employ him. John took him on as his field assistant and driver. The two of them set out on a collecting trip with many prison stops. Lead Belly, though uneasy once more inside high walls, was a great help as a knowledgeable ex-con who could get the inmates singing. But neither man was happy on the trip. John watched 44-year-old Lead Belly as if he were a wayward teenager. They had one spat after another. Lead Belly missed his friends and especially his girlfriend. All the same, when John was booked to lecture and sing for the Modern Language Society in Philadelphia, Lead Belly went along. He got into the act and was a huge success, deftly passing the hat afterwards. In another appearance at Bryn Mawr College the dean objected to Lead Belly's antics. John was also having doubts. Contradictions were sprouting for the Lomaxes. John saw himself as a serious scholar, but earned his living by playing the cowboy on the lecture circuit. Wor...

Alan Lomax: An Ear For Folk - Swans

Sun, Oct 2, 2011
Kentucky recording black music where they found it. This would be an On the Road intent on the roadside, not on what happened inside the car. They often stopped at prisons. In the penitentiary at Angola in Louisiana they met Huddie Ledbetter, the charismatic "King of the Twelve-String Guitar," and better known as Lead Belly. He was serving time for violent crime. Bidding the Lomaxes goodbye, Lead Belly told them to get him out and he would travel with them as chauffeur and servant. Here began the Lomax-Leadbelly intimacy that would end in imbroglio and furnish another emblematic anecdote of race in America pre-1960s. They made an odd threesome. Up front strode the southern gentleman with his underside of "po' white" prejudice. Then came his liberal, semi-rebellious son tinged with east-coast radicalism. Trailing behind, but sometimes leap-frogging both of them, alternately slouching or prancing, was Huddie Ledbetter, musical genius and veteran of chain gangs. His eyes were on a better life. The Lomaxes returned to Angola in 1934. They recorded a song in which Lead Belly asked the governor for his freedom and left a copy with the prison secretary before driving on. This laid the groundwork of the legend that they had obtained his release. It was a misunderstanding that they never cared to correct. Lead Belly was in fact released a month after their visit, but simply because he had served a sufficient part of his sentence. Once free, Lead Belly couldn't find a job and again asked John Lomax to employ him. John took him on as his field assistant and driver. The two of them set out on a collecting trip with many prison stops. Lead Belly, though uneasy once more inside high walls, was a great help as a knowledgeable ex-con who could get the inmates singing. But neither man was happy on the trip. John watched 44-year-old Lead Belly as if he were a wayward teenager. They had one spat after another. Lead Belly missed his friends and especially his girlfriend. All the same, when John was booked to lecture and sing for the Modern Language Society in Philadelphia, Lead Belly went along. He got into the act and was a huge success, deftly passing the hat afterwards. In another appearance at Bryn Mawr College the dean objected to Lead Belly's antics. John was also having doubts. Contradictions were sprouting for the Lomaxes. John saw himself as a serious scholar, but earned his living by playing the cowboy on the lecture circuit. Wor...

Alan Lomax: An Ear For Folk - Swans

Fri, Sep 30, 2011
Kentucky recording black music where they found it. This would be an On the Road intent on the roadside, not on what happened inside the car. They often stopped at prisons. In the penitentiary at Angola in Louisiana they met Huddie Ledbetter, the charismatic "King of the Twelve-String Guitar," and better known as Lead Belly. He was serving time for violent crime. Bidding the Lomaxes goodbye, Lead Belly told them to get him out and he would travel with them as chauffeur and servant. Here began the Lomax-Leadbelly intimacy that would end in imbroglio and furnish another emblematic anecdote of race in America pre-1960s. They made an odd threesome. Up front strode the southern gentleman with his underside of "po' white" prejudice. Then came his liberal, semi-rebellious son tinged with east-coast radicalism. Trailing behind, but sometimes leap-frogging both of them, alternately slouching or prancing, was Huddie Ledbetter, musical genius and veteran of chain gangs. His eyes were on a better life. The Lomaxes returned to Angola in 1934. They recorded a song in which Lead Belly asked the governor for his freedom and left a copy with the prison secretary before driving on. This laid the groundwork of the legend that they had obtained his release. It was a misunderstanding that they never cared to correct. Lead Belly was in fact released a month after their visit, but simply because he had served a sufficient part of his sentence. Once free, Lead Belly couldn't find a job and again asked John Lomax to employ him. John took him on as his field assistant and driver. The two of them set out on a collecting trip with many prison stops. Lead Belly, though uneasy once more inside high walls, was a great help as a knowledgeable ex-con who could get the inmates singing. But neither man was happy on the trip. John watched 44-year-old Lead Belly as if he were a wayward teenager. They had one spat after another. Lead Belly missed his friends and especially his girlfriend. All the same, when John was booked to lecture and sing for the Modern Language Society in Philadelphia, Lead Belly went along. He got into the act and was a huge success, deftly passing the hat afterwards. In another appearance at Bryn Mawr College the dean objected to Lead Belly's antics. John was also having doubts. Contradictions were sprouting for the Lomaxes. John saw himself as a serious scholar, but earned his living by playing the cowboy on the lecture circuit. Wor...

Alan Lomax: An Ear For Folk - Swans

Fri, Sep 30, 2011
Kentucky recording black music where they found it. This would be an On the Road intent on the roadside, not on what happened inside the car. They often stopped at prisons. In the penitentiary at Angola in Louisiana they met Huddie Ledbetter, the charismatic "King of the Twelve-String Guitar," and better known as Lead Belly. He was serving time for violent crime. Bidding the Lomaxes goodbye, Lead Belly told them to get him out and he would travel with them as chauffeur and servant. Here began the Lomax-Leadbelly intimacy that would end in imbroglio and furnish another emblematic anecdote of race in America pre-1960s. They made an odd threesome. Up front strode the southern gentleman with his underside of "po' white" prejudice. Then came his liberal, semi-rebellious son tinged with east-coast radicalism. Trailing behind, but sometimes leap-frogging both of them, alternately slouching or prancing, was Huddie Ledbetter, musical genius and veteran of chain gangs. His eyes were on a better life. The Lomaxes returned to Angola in 1934. They recorded a song in which Lead Belly asked the governor for his freedom and left a copy with the prison secretary before driving on. This laid the groundwork of the legend that they had obtained his release. It was a misunderstanding that they never cared to correct. Lead Belly was in fact released a month after their visit, but simply because he had served a sufficient part of his sentence. Once free, Lead Belly couldn't find a job and again asked John Lomax to employ him. John took him on as his field assistant and driver. The two of them set out on a collecting trip with many prison stops. Lead Belly, though uneasy once more inside high walls, was a great help as a knowledgeable ex-con who could get the inmates singing. But neither man was happy on the trip. John watched 44-year-old Lead Belly as if he were a wayward teenager. They had one spat after another. Lead Belly missed his friends and especially his girlfriend. All the same, when John was booked to lecture and sing for the Modern Language Society in Philadelphia, Lead Belly went along. He got into the act and was a huge success, deftly passing the hat afterwards. In another appearance at Bryn Mawr College the dean objected to Lead Belly's antics. John was also having doubts. Contradictions were sprouting for the Lomaxes. John saw himself as a serious scholar, but earned his living by playing the cowboy on the lecture circuit. Wor...




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