Nesbitt Funeral Home

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Funeral Homes > New Jersey > Elizabeth > Nesbitt Funeral Home

Nesbitt Funeral Home

Nesbitt Funeral Home
165 Madison Avenue
Elizabeth, NJ 07201
Phone: (908) 352-7078
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Nesbitt Funeral Home is a funeral home located in Elizabeth, NJ. Other Nearby funeral homes, memorial chapels, cemeteries, and funeral services providers are listed below. Browse by the cities and towns surrounding Elizabeth, New Jersey and near Nesbitt Funeral Home.


 

Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Gov. Cuomo proposes reducing tolls heading into Staten Island - The Star-Ledger - NJ.com

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Aristide Economopoulos/The Star-LedgerThe Goethals Bridge spans the Arthur Kill linking Elizabeth, New Jersey, bottom, with the Howland Hook area of Staten Island, New York. STATEN ISLAND — New Jerseyans who use an E-ZPass to head into Staten Island may get a big toll break under a new discount plan that New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced to the Staten Island Advance. Under a new 60 percent discount plan, drivers with E-ZPass will pay $4.75 starting on their third trip and for each...

Elizabeth Parks, gifted artist - Cape Gazette

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Elizabeth “Betty” Parks (nee Elliot), 84, of Millsboro, passed away peacefully Saturday, June 23, 2012. Her family was her greatest joy in life, and she delighted in hosting many family gatherings. Born in Staten Island, N.Y., she spent her formative years in Kearny, N.J., and graduated from Kearny High in 1946. In 1951 she married Henry “Hank” Parks. Together they raised four children, first in B...

Comic actor in Beatles' movies, Victor Spinetti dies at 82 - San Jose Mercury News

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
London to develop his acting career. His more than 30 film roles included the part of Hortensio in "The Taming of the Shrew" and Mog Edwards in "Under Milk Wood," both films starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. He also played the concierge in "The Return of the Pink Panther." Spinetti was co-author of the script and did two voices for "Romeo, Juliet" -- Armando Acosta's 1990 film which featured 108 cats and the actor John Hurt. The difficulty with the script, Spinetti told The Associated Press in a 1988 interview, was blending such things as cats and cars with Shakespeare's classic verse. "Some cats talk about cars so you have to try to get this into the script without the audience jolting out of their seats. Of course, you cannot rewrite something like the balcony scene," he said. Barbara Windsor, a star of the "Carry On" films, said Tuesday that she had visited Spinetti at his hospice last week. "He didn't look ill. He looked great. He was swearing a lot, like that would get rid of the illness, and we just laughed," she said. Funeral arrangements were not immediately announced.

Bert Weedon, Guitar Teacher to a Generation, Dies at 91

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
BBC’s house band. Mr. Weedon’s first marriage ended in divorce. Survivors include his second wife, Maggie; two sons, Geoffrey and Lionel; and grandchildren. In 2001, Queen Elizabeth II presented Mr. Weedon with the Order of the British Empire. At the ceremony, Her Majesty asked him whether he had brought his guitar along. His reply, and her musical requests, if any, are unrecorded. (New York Times)

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t waiting for the government to do a cleanup. His 6-year-old son, Jonathan, was diagnosed this spring with having an elevated level of lead in his body. “That was the last straw,” Shefton said. He’s in the process of selling his home. The family moved to another neighborhood last week. “Somebody needs to take care of this problem, or inform the people in this neighborhood,” he said. Concerns surfaced over a decade ago Most of the nation’s lead factories — some huge manufacturing complexes and others tiny storefront melting shops — had been largely shuttered by the 1970s and 1980s. Often known as smelters, they emitted thousands of pounds of lead and other toxic metal particles into the air as they melted down batteries and other products containing lead. The particles would land on nearby properties, potentially mixing with lead dust from automobile exhaust or paint chips — significant sources, says the government — to create a hazard. Children who play in lead-contaminated soil, sticking dust-covered hands or toys in their mouths, over time can suffer lost intelligence and other irreversible health problems. In April 2001, environmental scientist William Eckel published a research article in the American Journal of Public Health warning about the dangers of old smelting factories. While working on his Ph.D. dissertation, Eckel had identified a historical smelting site unknown to federal and state regulators and wondered how many other sites had been forgotten over time, their buildings demolished or absorbed by other businesses. Eckel used old industry directories, which he cross-referenced with EPA databases, to come up with a list of more than 400 potential lead-smelting sites that appeared to be unknown to federal regulators. (Page 4 of 13) Eckel confirmed that 20 of the sites’ addresses were factories -- and not just business offices -- using Sanborn fire insurance maps, which detail the historical uses of individual pieces of property. Another 86 sites were specifically listed in directories as “plant” locations. He paid to have soil samples tested from three sites in Baltimore and five in Philadelphia. All but one of the samples exceeded the EPA’s residential hazard level for lead in areas where children play. Eckel’s article warned that the findings “should create some sense of urgency for the investigation of the other sites identified here because they may represent a significant source of exposure to lead in their local environments.” The research indicates “a significant fraction” of the forgotten sites will require cleanups -- likely at state and federal expense -- because most of the companies went out of business long ago. Buried by bureauc...

Artist Alley had rich newspaper heritage

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Alabama football coach Bear Bryant that led to a highly sought-after print. But his art was more inclusive. "He did a lot of paintings from portraits to landscapes," said his daughter, Elizabeth Alley, an artist and technical writer. "He sold his work sometimes, but a lot of times he did it just to give to people." Son Richard said that as a child, it "was amazing to watch. I would go to bed at night when he was sitting down to work on something. I would wake up in the morning, and there was this wonderful watercolor there. It was like Christmas every morning." Alley said his father continued to paint after his diagnosis, doing beach scenes and sunsets. Mr. Alley's first cousin, Dan Conaway, a marketing and advertising consultant and freelance writer, said that Mr. Alley improved on an inherited talent. "Rick comes from a long line of very talented artists and cartoonists, and I think Rick was the most talented. His dad and granddad were more about political cartooning than art. It was all about the visual side to Rick." Mr. Alley also leaves another daughter, Katherine Borden of Fort Lauderdale, and a sister, Jehl Palvado of Gulf Shores, Ala. Arrangements are incomplete. (The Commercial Appeal)

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t waiting for the government to do a cleanup. His 6-year-old son, Jonathan, was diagnosed this spring with having an elevated level of lead in his body. “That was the last straw,” Shefton said. He’s in the process of selling his home. The family moved to another neighborhood last week. “Somebody needs to take care of this problem, or inform the people in this neighborhood,” he said. Concerns surfaced over a decade ago Most of the nation’s lead factories — some huge manufacturing complexes and others tiny storefront melting shops — had been largely shuttered by the 1970s and 1980s. Often known as smelters, they emitted thousands of pounds of lead and other toxic metal particles into the air as they melted down batteries and other products containing lead. The particles would land on nearby properties, potentially mixing with lead dust from automobile exhaust or paint chips — significant sources, says the government — to create a hazard. Children who play in lead-contaminated soil, sticking dust-covered hands or toys in their mouths, over time can suffer lost intelligence and other irreversible health problems. In April 2001, environmental scientist William Eckel published a research article in the American Journal of Public Health warning about the dangers of old smelting factories. While working on his Ph.D. dissertation, Eckel had identified a historical smelting site unknown to federal and state regulators and wondered how many other sites had been forgotten over time, their buildings demolished or absorbed by other businesses. Eckel used old industry directories, which he cross-referenced with EPA databases, to come up with a list of more than 400 potential lead-smelting sites that appeared to be unknown to federal regulators. (Page 4 of 13) Eckel confirmed that 20 of the sites’ addresses were factories -- and not just business offices -- using Sanborn fire insurance maps, which detail the historical uses of individual pieces of property. Another 86 sites were specifically listed in directories as “plant” locations. He paid to have soil samples tested from three sites in Baltimore and five in Philadelphia. All but one of the samples exceeded the EPA’s residential hazard level for lead in areas where children play. Eckel’s article warned that the findings “should create some sense of urgency for the investigation of the other sites identified here because they may represent a significant source of exposure to lead in their local environments.” The research indicates “a significant fraction” of the forgotten sites will require cleanups -- likely at state and federal expense -- because most of the companies went out of business long ago. Buried by bureauc...

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t waiting for the government to do a cleanup. His 6-year-old son, Jonathan, was diagnosed this spring with having an elevated level of lead in his body. “That was the last straw,” Shefton said. He’s in the process of selling his home. The family moved to another neighborhood last week. “Somebody needs to take care of this problem, or inform the people in this neighborhood,” he said. Concerns surfaced over a decade ago Most of the nation’s lead factories — some huge manufacturing complexes and others tiny storefront melting shops — had been largely shuttered by the 1970s and 1980s. Often known as smelters, they emitted thousands of pounds of lead and other toxic metal particles into the air as they melted down batteries and other products containing lead. The particles would land on nearby properties, potentially mixing with lead dust from automobile exhaust or paint chips — significant sources, says the government — to create a hazard. Children who play in lead-contaminated soil, sticking dust-covered hands or toys in their mouths, over time can suffer lost intelligence and other irreversible health problems. In April 2001, environmental scientist William Eckel published a research article in the American Journal of Public Health warning about the dangers of old smelting factories. While working on his Ph.D. dissertation, Eckel had identified a historical smelting site unknown to federal and state regulators and wondered how many other sites had been forgotten over time, their buildings demolished or absorbed by other businesses. Eckel used old industry directories, which he cross-referenced with EPA databases, to come up with a list of more than 400 potential lead-smelting sites that appeared to be unknown to federal regulators. (Page 4 of 13) Eckel confirmed that 20 of the sites’ addresses were factories -- and not just business offices -- using Sanborn fire insurance maps, which detail the historical uses of individual pieces of property. Another 86 sites were specifically listed in directories as “plant” locations. He paid to have soil samples tested from three sites in Baltimore and five in Philadelphia. All but one of the samples exceeded the EPA’s residential hazard level for lead in areas where children play. Eckel’s article warned that the findings “should create some sense of urgency for the investigation of the other sites identified here because they may represent a significant source of exposure to lead in their local environments.” The research indicates “a significant fraction” of the forgotten sites will require cleanups -- likely at state and federal expense -- because most of the companies went out of business long ago. Buried by bureauc...

Mike Connell: End of the Underground Railroad - Port Huron Times Herald

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Frantz told me last week. She has spent uncounted hours exploring the family connections. From what she has learned, Alice Thompson and John Brown shared an aunt — a woman named Elizabeth Mills — although they were not related. “It is certain, however, that Rev. Thompson was personally acquainted with John Brown,” Frantz reported. «« »» THOMPSON SAW the St. Clair River for the first time in 1831 when he traveled from Detroit to Fort Gratiot on the steamer Argo. “This boat was a novelty in the way of steamboats, at least it would be so now in the eyes of a ship-carpenter,” he would write many years later. “It was literally what is called a dugout. It was made of two logs put together in the form of a large canoe, decked over, and on this platform was placed a cabin and the engine.” The region obviously made an impression, because he and his bride settled at Palmer, as St. Clair was known at the time, a few months after their wedding in 1832. The African-American heritage in St. Clair is as old as the community itself. One of the earliest settlers in the 1780s was a free black, Jean Baptiste Point du Sable, who eventually moved on with his Chippewa bride. They are remembered today as the founders of Chicago. Another early black settler was the indomitable Malinda Paris, who worshiped at the Congregational church founded by the Rev. Thompson in St. Clair. Paris was born in Kentucky in 1824. Her father was a slave, but her mother had been born free and desperately wanted the same for her children. Unfortunately, the man who owned Malinda’s father insisted the children were his property and sought to enslave them. «« »» MALINDA’S MOTHER tried to buy her husband’s freedom, but she could not raise the $1,500 asking price. Rather than risk their children’s freedom, the parents made a heart-wrenching choice, a story retold by the St. Clair Republican on Oct. 27, 1892, when it published Malinda’s obituary. (Page 3 of 5) “He urged her to take the children and go north, choosing to die there alone in slavery rather than run the risk of having them stolen from her,” the newspaper reported. “She finally did so, taking her departure in the night, her husband, unknown to his master, accompanying them nine miles of the way. “They then knelt together and prayed and sang a parting hymn, and the father turned back alone to end his life a slave, while the faithful mother hurriedly bore her children onward to a place of safety. “They never met again on earth.” «« »» THE WARD BROTHERS, among the...

Wren, Mauldin each win twice at IP Classic - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 1, 2012
Kyle Heppeard, who played collegiately as a catcher at Ohio University, is the new baseball coach at Shannon Forest. The Crusaders also have a first-year track program, coached by Bob Collins and Elizabeth Tate. The team has five meets scheduled in its first season. Easley senior Joseph Smith has signed to continue his football career as a long snapper at NCAA Division II Delta State (Miss.) University. Former North Greenville University Jamey Chadwell was hired in January to lead the Delta State program. Smith is the fourth member of the 2011 Green Wave headed for college football, joining Brandaun Addison (Gardner-Webb), Zach Lappin (Mars Hill) and Andrew Gilstrap (North Greenville).




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