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Funeral Homes > Maryland

Funeral Homes in Maryland (MD)

Funeral homes, funeral directors, mortuaries, crematoriums and  by city in Maryland. Select a Maryland city to view local funeral home services, locations, addresses, and phone numbers for each listing.

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Aberdeen Funeral Homes
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Thomas E. Davis, railroader - Baltimore Sun

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Pennsylvania Station — was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville. He was a 1970 graduate of Dulaney High School and after attending the University of Maryland, Baltimore County for a year went to work for Penn Central as a trainee engineer. Promoted to engineer, Mr. Davis later worked for Penn Central's successor, Conrail, before joining Amtrak as a passenger train engineer. "He loved the railroad and worked the Northeast Corridor from Washington to New York," said his wife of 39 years and high school sweetheart, the former ...

Pr. George's school chief finalist for Philadelphia job - Washington Post

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
She is a former superintendent of the D.C. public schools. Hite has worked in Prince George’s, the second-largest school system in Maryland, since June 2006, when he was hired as deputy superintendent. He took over as interim chief of the system after the abrupt resignation of John E. Deasy in 2008. Hite said he has been in discussions with Philadelphia for weeks. He said that although he has “not sought out other employment opportunities, I have been approached on numerous occasions and have turned them down.” But he said he could not pass up the chance to consider a move to Philadelphia. “...

Paul J. Feeley, public defender - Baltimore Sun

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Timonium home. He was 86. Born in Baltimore and raised on West Fayette Street and on Guilford Avenue, he was a 1942 Loyola High School graduate. He attended what is now Loyola University Maryland for two years and then joined the Army Air Forces during World War II. He spent most of his time in the service in Walla Walla, Wash., training as a bombardier, family members said. After the war, he resumed his studies at Loyola and earned a degree in 1948. He was junior class president and played varsity basketball. Mr. Feeley remained active in the school's alumni group and was the college's alumni association president in...

Lockheed, machinists reach tentative agreement - Centre Daily Times

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Most union members on strike work at the Fort Worth plant. The flight test centers at Edwards Air Force Base in California and Patuxtent River Naval Air Station in Maryland both have fewer than 150 union members. The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers District Lodge 776 represents about a quarter of the 14,000 workers at Lockheed Martin's Fort Worth plant. Those on strike do most of the aircraft assembly and manufacturing work on the F-35 and F-16 fighter jets or service the machines and facilities. The F-35 Joint Strike Fighter is a supersonic stealth jet and is the nation's most advanced and expensive weapons program. Concerns about its safety, cost overruns and questions about the entire program's feasibility have delayed pilot training and caused increased scrutiny by the Pentagon and Congress. Costing between $65 million and $100 million each, depending on the version, the F-35 is described as a generational leap from older fighter jets. The single-seat aircraft can fly at speeds of about 1,050 mph.

Jacksonville Bancorp, Inc. Declares Dividend - Sacramento Bee

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
June 30, 2012. The dividend will be payable to stockholders of record as of June 30, 2012, and will be paid on July 9, 2012. Jacksonville Bancorp, Inc. is a Maryland chartered stock holding company that owns 100% of Jacksonville Savings Bank. Jacksonville Savings Bank is an Illinois-chartered savings bank headquartered in Jacksonville, Illinois, whose deposits are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation. SOURCE Jacksonville Bancorp, Inc. What You Should Know About Comments on Sacbee.com Sacbee.com is happy to provide a forum for reader interaction, discussion, f...

George K. McKinney, U.S. marshal - Baltimore Sun

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
George K. McKinney, who was the first African-American to be appointed U.S. marshal for the District of Maryland, and whose career in federal service spanned more than four decades, died June 17 of leukemia at...

Charles W. Colson, Watergate Felon Who Became Evangelical Leader, Dies at 80

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Few played political hardball more fiercely than Mr. Colson. When a deluded janitor from Milwaukee shot Gov. George C. Wallace of Alabama on the presidential campaign trial in Maryland in May 1972, Nixon asked about the suspect’s politics. Mr. Colson replied, “Well, he’s going to be a left-winger by the time we get through.” He proposed a political frame-up: planting leftist pamphlets in the would-be killer’s apartment. “Good,” the president said, as recorded on a White House tape. “Keep at that.” Mr. Colson hired E. Howard Hunt, a veteran covert operator for the Central Intelligence Agency, to spy on the president’s opponents. Their plots became part of the cascade of high crimes and misdemeanors known as Watergate. The scandal began to unravel after Mr. Hunt and five other C.I.A. and F.B.I. veterans were arrested in June 1972 after a botched burglary and wiretapping operation at Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate office complex in Washington. To this day, no one knows whether Nixon authorized the break-in or precisely what the burglars wanted. “When I write my memoirs,” Mr. Colson told Mr. Hunt in a November 1972 telephone conversation, “I’m going to say that the Watergate was brilliantly conceived as an escapade that would divert the Democrats’ attention from the real issues, and therefore permit us to win a landslide that we probably wouldn’t have won otherwise.” The two men laughed. That month, Nixon won that landslide. On election night, the president watched the returns with Mr. Colson and the White House chief of staff, H. R. Haldeman. “I couldn’t feel any sense of jubilation,” Mr. Colson said in a 1992 television interview. “Here we were, supposedly winning, and it was more like we’d lost.” Laurie Goodstein contributed reporting. (New York Times)

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Web. • A failure to act. In Pennsylvania, Maryland and Wisconsin, the EPA sent investigators to scores of sites from 2004 to 2006 after verifying a lead smelter once operated. The investigators recommended soil tests in the neighborhoods. Most of the tests were not done. • A failure to protect. Even when state and federal regulators tested soil and found high levels of lead, as they did around sites in Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Portland, Ore., they failed for years to alert neighbors or order cleanups. Some kids who played in yards with heavily contaminated soil have dangerous levels of lead in their bodies, according to medical records obtained by USA TODAY. In response to the investigation and USA TODAY’s soil tests in 21 neighborhoods across the nation, government officials are taking action at old smelter sites in 14 states, ranging from reopening flawed investigations to testing soil to cleaning up contaminated property. In March, New York City officials closed four ball fields in a Brooklyn park after learning from USA TODAY that the area was a former smelter site with elevated levels of lead. “EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t wai...

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Web. • A failure to act. In Pennsylvania, Maryland and Wisconsin, the EPA sent investigators to scores of sites from 2004 to 2006 after verifying a lead smelter once operated. The investigators recommended soil tests in the neighborhoods. Most of the tests were not done. • A failure to protect. Even when state and federal regulators tested soil and found high levels of lead, as they did around sites in Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Portland, Ore., they failed for years to alert neighbors or order cleanups. Some kids who played in yards with heavily contaminated soil have dangerous levels of lead in their bodies, according to medical records obtained by USA TODAY. In response to the investigation and USA TODAY’s soil tests in 21 neighborhoods across the nation, government officials are taking action at old smelter sites in 14 states, ranging from reopening flawed investigations to testing soil to cleaning up contaminated property. In March, New York City officials closed four ball fields in a Brooklyn park after learning from USA TODAY that the area was a former smelter site with elevated levels of lead. “EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t wai...

Lead hazards were long ignored - Greenville News

Sun, Apr 22, 2012
Web. • A failure to act. In Pennsylvania, Maryland and Wisconsin, the EPA sent investigators to scores of sites from 2004 to 2006 after verifying a lead smelter once operated. The investigators recommended soil tests in the neighborhoods. Most of the tests were not done. • A failure to protect. Even when state and federal regulators tested soil and found high levels of lead, as they did around sites in Philadelphia, Cleveland, Chicago and Portland, Ore., they failed for years to alert neighbors or order cleanups. Some kids who played in yards with heavily contaminated soil have dangerous levels of lead in their bodies, according to medical records obtained by USA TODAY. In response to the investigation and USA TODAY’s soil tests in 21 neighborhoods across the nation, government officials are taking action at old smelter sites in 14 states, ranging from reopening flawed investigations to testing soil to cleaning up contaminated property. In March, New York City officials closed four ball fields in a Brooklyn park after learning from USA TODAY that the area was a former smelter site with elevated levels of lead. “EPA and our state and local partners have overseen thousands of cleanups, through a variety of programs,” said Mathy Stanislaus, an EPA assistant administrator. “Unfortunately, some of the sites USA TODAY identified have not yet been addressed or investigated by EPA. EPA will review USA TODAY’s information to determine what steps can be taken to ensure Americans are not being exposed to dangerous levels of lead.” The EPA says it has worked with states to assess most of the sites on the 2001 list but that record-keeping is “incomplete” for many. Eighteen sites received some kind of cleanup but most weren’t considered dangerous enough to qualify for federal action. (Page 3 of 13) “I am convinced we have addressed the highest-risk sites,” said Elizabeth Southerland, director of assessment and remediation for the EPA’s Superfund program. “Absolutely and positively, we are open to reassessing sites that we now feel, based on your information, need another look.” EPA staff members said additional site reviews are under way, including checks of 48 sites the agency determined were never assessed. And the EPA said it will work with Ohio environmental regulators to re-examine the Cleveland neighborhood near Shefton’s home to see whether a cleanup evaluation there is appropriate. But Ken Shefton and his family aren’t wai...



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