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Funeral Homes > Maine > Sanford

Sanford, ME  Funeral Homes

The following funeral service provider list is in Sanford, Maine. Please select a funeral home listing below to view more details about local services provided.
 
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Stoneworks
29 Winter Street
Sanford , ME 04073
(207) 324-3090
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Sanford McDonnell, Aerospace Leader, Dies at 89

Thu, Mar 22, 2012
Sanford N. McDonnell, who succeeded his uncle as chairman of the aerospace company McDonnell Douglas and, through the 1980s, modernized its management systems, remade the corporate culture and sharply increased earnings, died on Monday at his home in Clayton, Mo. He was 89. The cause was complications of pancreatic cancer, his son, Randall, said. Mr. McDonnell, an engineer, became chairman of the... (New York Times)

Circulation manager loved people

Wed, Feb 29, 2012
He owned a store called Laura's Candy and Ice Cream in Shipbottom, N.J. Mr. Lambert worked at two newspapers before joining The Commercial Appeal. Otis L. Sanford, the newspaper's former managing editor, developed a close friendship with Mr. Lambert over their love of Pennsylvania football. Sanford: Pittsburgh Steelers. Mr. Lambert: Philadelphia Eagles. "The guy had an unbelievable, amazing magnetic personality," said Sanford, who is a professor at the University of Memphis who holds the Hardin Chair of Excellence in Journalism. "I always appreciated how much he loved newspapers. He had an amazing understanding of just how important they are to a community." As much as he loved the newspaper, Mr. Lambert also fell in love with Memphis during the six years he lived here. His Facebook page spreads a picture of the lighted Hernando DeSoto Bridge across the top. He loved attending Memphis events like the Live in the Garden Series at the Memphis Botanic Garden, said Paul Jewell, marketing director. "He always had something good to say," said Maria McLendon, director of marketing and communications for the Bartlett Area Chamber of Commerce. "He always made you feel better about yourself. You never walked away from Lou without a smile on your face." He dressed in a white jumpsuit, dark glasses long sideburns and dark hair during Elvis Week in 2008. He passed out fans and sold newspapers. Elvis Christmas music blared from his office every December. On his first blog post for 2012, Mr. Lambert made several resolutions for 2013 so he had time to work on them. There were typical ones, such as not procrastinating and not forwarding chain e-mails. At the top he used a quote: "I resolve to laugh every day, eat more chocolate, sleep in on Sundays, make dinner an event, breathe more deeply, spend more time with the people I love." His funeral arrangements are incomplete. -- Cindy Wolff: (901) 529-2378 ... (The Commercial Appeal)

Funeral services announced for mass homicide victims; court appearance set for ... - The Birmingham News - al.com (blog)

Fri, Feb 17, 2012
Funeral services for Jonathan Sanchez, 23, will be held Saturday at noon at Macedonia Missionary Baptist Church, Ensley, with burial in Elmwood Cemetery.Funeral services for Demetrius Sanford, 19, will be held Saturday at 2 p.m. at Metropolitan A.M.E. Zion Church. Burial will be in Zion Memorial Gardens. Public viewing for Charles "C.J." Render, 21, and his uncle Ronnie Render, 42, will be Friday 1-8 p.m. at Serenity Chapel 1714 Ave F, Ensley. Funeral services will be Saturday at 2 p.m. at Metropolitan AME Zion Church, 1530 4th Avenue N. Interment will follow at Zion Memorial Cemetery. Police Chief A.C. Roper said tonight police believe all suspects directly involved in the slayings are in custody. "The investigation is far from over although we've charged the individuals we believe committed...

Yes, you owe that Amazon sales tax - Greenville News

Sun, Feb 5, 2012
Amazon almost walked away from building a distribution center in Lexington County when the state House of Representatives initially refused to honor part of deal cut by outgoing Gov. Mark Sanford that gave the online retailer an exemption from having to collect the sales tax. State legislators did the right thing and created the exemption to save jobs that this state needs, but they also insisted that Amazon send South Carolina shoppers an annual tally of all their purchases and a reminder that they may owe sales tax on them. That deal is why those notices from Amazon.com have arrived in email boxes in our state over the past few days. Congress now is taking seriously the need for federal legislation to require all but the smallest business to collect sales taxes on online purchases. This law should be passed to create a level playing field and shore up the budgets of state and local governments throughout the country.

Funeral directory for Jan. 14, 2012 - The Daily News Online

Sun, Jan 15, 2012
The Activities Department at the Absolut at Houghton Nursing Home, 9876 Luckey Dr., Houghton NY 14744. Denny, Jacob H. — Friends may call from 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday at Burdett & Sanford Funeral Home, 11 Maple Ave., Oakfield, where Jake’s funeral service will immediately follow calling hours at 3.  In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Tidewell Hospice, 12034 North Access Rd., Port Charlotte, Fla. 33981, ARC Prep for Life, or the Wolcott United Methodist Church.  Burial will be in Reed Cemetery, Oakfield. Condolences may be made at www.burdettandsanford.com. Gerasimchik, Theda I. — Friends may call from 1 to 3 & 5 to 6 p.m. Sunday at Robinson & Hackemer Funeral Home, 246 North Main St., Warsaw where a service will be held immediately following calling hours at 6. Burial will be at a later date at Glenwood Cemetery, Perry. Online condolences at www.robinsonandhackemer.com. LaPorte, Russell James — Friends and family gathered at the home Monday evening to celebrate his life. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his name to First United Methodist Church, 400 S. Graham, Pryor, OK 74361. Logsdon, Susan M — Friends may attend services at 11 a.m., Saturday at H.E. Turner & Co. Funeral Home, 403 East Main St., Batavia. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Keuka Comfort Care Home, P.O. Box 107, Penn Yan, NY 14527. Burial will be in Elmwood Cemetery, Batavia. Condolences may be made at www.bataviafuneralhomes.com. Merkle, Evelyn B. — Calling hours will be from 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday at Marley Funeral Home, 135 Main St. in Attica.  A funeral service will follow at 3 followed by burial in Pleasant View Cemetery in Orangeville. Memorials are requested to the Attica Rescue Squad, 11 Water St., Attica, NY 14011. Peterson, Dorothy J. — There will be no prior visitation.  A memorial service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday at the Bohm-Calarco-Smith Funeral Home, 308 East Main St., Batavia. A full obituary will be published in a later edition of The Daily News. Quintern, Joseph J. ‘‘Joe’’ — There will be no calling hours. There will be a private ceremony in Le Roy. Radzinski, Harriet E. Burrs — Family and friends may call from noon to 6 p.m. Jan. 21 at the family home at 7785 Oatka Trail Road, Le Roy. The courtesy of no flowers is requested and memorials may be made to the family. Online condolences may be offered at www.LeRoyFuneralHome.com Rice, Mildred N. ‘‘Lillian’’ — Family and friends may visit from...

History of pioneer N.C. aviator revealed in photos - Charlotte Observer

Thu, Dec 29, 2011
That was typical of old-time pilots. "Unfortunately, a lot of times families don't know about what they (pilots) did until they pass away," said Claude Sanford a volunteer with the Dolph Overton Aviation Library at the Carolinas Aviation Museum. "These guys didn't think they were heroes. They figured they weren't doing anything that everybody else was doing." The Anthony materials will help tell the Carolinas aviation story, he said. For Jason Harpe, executive director of the Lincoln County Historical Museum, landing the collection "justifies what I do for a living." Historically important materials can fall through the cracks. But the Anthony collection was organized and interpreted by knowledgeable family members and now will "be saved and preserved and available for researchers," Harpe said. Organizing the collection connected Nancy Anthony even closer to her father. A dedicated reader of newspaper obituaries, she knows "everybody has a story." When folks search her father's collection she hopes it will "spur interest in their own family stories." "They need to talk to people and take notes," Anthony said. "And they need to do it now." ...

Munson: There will never be another like him - The Augusta Chronicle

Sat, Dec 17, 2011
Until that moment, Larry Munson was to me just a curious, gravelly voice that would send Bulldog fans into a frenzy during the pregame video at Sanford Stadium. Having covered three Georgia home games already that season, I’d never heard a Bulldogs broadcast to understand what all the fuss was about. Suddenly, as if on cue, strains of unbridled anguish that I’d never heard before came hurtling out of the dashboard. Tennessee had converted a 62-yard screen pass to take a 24-20 lead with 44 seconds to play. Munson was grieving over top of 100,000 voices in full throat. It was mesmerizing to listen to for the very first time. Having grown up a sports junkie listening to radio broadcasts as long as I can remember, the occasional homer hollering “we” once in a while was familiar. But never anything like this. And while every fiber of journalistic integrity was primed to cringe, the truth is it was beautiful. This un-radio-like voice had taken the angst of an entire fan base and turned it intopoetry. You couldn’t take your ears off it. Georgia and its first-year head coach Mark Richt and freshman quarterback David Greene were trying to answer Tennessee’s knockout punch, and Munson was weaving a tapestry like nothing I’ve ever heard before or since. He was speaking of “saving ourselves” and leaving “our hearts” at the other end of the field and spending “our last timeout” with 10 seconds left “like gold bullion.” Then of course came the play that the coaches called “P44 Haynes,” but every Georgia fan knows as the “hobnailed boot.” “A touchdown! My God a touchdown! We threw it ... we threw it to Haynes. We just stomped ’em with five seconds left. My God a-mighty did you see what he did? David Greene just straightened up and we snuck the fullback over. Haynes is keeping the ball. Haynes has come running all the way across to the bench. We just dumped it over to 26-24. We just stepped on their face with a hobnailed boot and broke their nose. We just crushed their face.” Maybe that was old hat to folks who had devoutly listened to Munson for 35 years and heard “My God, a freshman!” and “Run, Lindsay!” and “Sugar falling from the sky!” But if you can imagine for a second that the first call you ever heard Munson make was the hobnailed boot that crushed Tennessee’s face you can picture a newcomer to deep Southern football careening down I-20 with mouth agape. This was a truly unique thing on sports radio – a gifted homer. Having grown up in the world...

Museum and Gallery Listings for Dec. 16-22 - New York Times

Thu, Dec 15, 2011
It would be pretty hard not to. The collection is spectacular, an institutional treasure. 200 Eastern Parkway, at Prospect Park, (718) 638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org. (Holland Cotter) Brooklyn Museum: ‘Sanford Biggers: Sweet Funk — An Introspective’ (through Jan. 8) This show’s magical centerpiece is a stout, leafy tree that has grown up through the body of a baby grand piano and looks bound eventually to swallow the whole instrument. An invisible pianist plays “Strange Fruit,” the ode to lynching victims made famous by Billie Holiday. Other sculptures, installations and a video made by Mr. Biggers over the past decade attest to an exceptional talent for metaphorically envisioning African-American experience. 200 Easter Parkway, at Prospect Park, (718) 638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org. (Johnson) Brooklyn Museum: ‘Eva Hesse Spectres 1960’ (through Jan. 8) The 19 paintings of shadowy figures in this small but revealing show predate Eva Hesse’s signature sculptures and were made at a vulnerable time for her, just after she graduated from Yale’s art school. They show a young artist finding her focus (if not yet her medium) and exorcising her influences, which include Munch, Giacometti and, especially, de Kooning. 200 Eastern Parkway, at Prospect Park, (718) 638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org. (Karen Rosenberg) Brooklyn Museum: ‘Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture’ (through Feb. 12) Like many events that are the first of their kind, this sampling of the roles of same-sex desire — and unconventional notions of masculinity and femininity — in over 100 years of American portraiture feels both overdue and a little behind the times. Despite exemplary works by Marsde...

Museum and Gallery Listings for Dec. 16-22 - New York Times

Thu, Dec 15, 2011
It would be pretty hard not to. The collection is spectacular, an institutional treasure. 200 Eastern Parkway, at Prospect Park, (718) 638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org. (Holland Cotter) Brooklyn Museum: ‘Sanford Biggers: Sweet Funk — An Introspective’ (through Jan. 8) This show’s magical centerpiece is a stout, leafy tree that has grown up through the body of a baby grand piano and looks bound eventually to swallow the whole instrument. An invisible pianist plays “Strange Fruit,” the ode to lynching victims made famous by Billie Holiday. Other sculptures, installations and a video made by Mr. Biggers over the past decade attest to an exceptional talent for metaphorically envisioning African-American experience. 200 Easter Parkway, at Prospect Park, (718) 638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org. (Johnson) Brooklyn Museum: ‘Eva Hesse Spectres 1960’ (through Jan. 8) The 19 paintings of shadowy figures in this small but revealing show predate Eva Hesse’s signature sculptures and were made at a vulnerable time for her, just after she graduated from Yale’s art school. They show a young artist finding her focus (if not yet her medium) and exorcising her influences, which include Munch, Giacometti and, especially, de Kooning. 200 Eastern Parkway, at Prospect Park, (718) 638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org. (Karen Rosenberg) Brooklyn Museum: ‘Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture’ (through Feb. 12) Like many events that are the first of their kind, this sampling of the roles of same-sex desire — and unconventional notions of masculinity and femininity — in over 100 years of American portraiture feels both overdue and a little behind the times. Despite exemplary works by Marsde...

Musuem and Gallery Listings for Dec. 9-15 - New York Times

Sat, Dec 10, 2011
It would be pretty hard not to. The collection is spectacular, an institutional treasure. 200 Eastern Parkway, at Prospect Park, (718) 638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org. (Holland Cotter) Brooklyn Museum: ‘Sanford Biggers: Sweet Funk — An Introspective’ (through Jan. 8) This show’s magical centerpiece is a stout, leafy tree that has grown up through the body of a baby grand piano and looks bound eventually to swallow the whole instrument. An invisible pianist plays “Strange Fruit,” the ode to lynching victims made famous by Billie Holiday. Other sculptures, installations and a video made by Mr. Biggers over the past decade attest to an exceptional talent for metaphorically envisioning African-American experience. 200 Easter Parkway, at Prospect Park, (718) 638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org. (Ken Johnson) Brooklyn Museum: ‘Eva Hesse Spectres 1960’ (through Jan. 8) The 19 paintings of shadowy figures in this small but revealing show predate Eva Hesse’s signature sculptures and were made at a vulnerable time for her, just after she graduated from Yale’s art school. They show a young artist finding her focus (if not yet her medium) and exorcising her influences, which include Munch, Giacometti and, especially, de Kooning. 200 Eastern Parkway, at Prospect Park, (718) 638-5000, brooklynmuseum.org. (Karen Rosenberg) Brooklyn Museum: ‘Hide/Seek: Difference and Desire in American Portraiture’ (throu...




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