Brannen Nesmith Funeral Home

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Funeral Homes > Georgia > Vienna > Brannen Nesmith Funeral Home

Brannen Nesmith Funeral Home

Brannen Nesmith Funeral Home
1407 East Union Street
Vienna, GA 31092
Phone: (478) 627-3755
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Brannen Nesmith Funeral Home is a funeral home located in Vienna, GA. Other Nearby funeral homes, memorial chapels, cemeteries, and funeral services providers are listed below. Browse by the cities and towns surrounding Vienna, Georgia and near Brannen Nesmith Funeral Home.

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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Charles V. (Tod) Carmichael, 88 of Belpre, - Jackson County Newspapers

Wed, Feb 29, 2012
Suzanne George and Cory and Breanna Seevers, five great grandchildren, Makayla, Megan, Logan, Leah and Zane.  Also surviving are his brother, Warren Carmichael of Sun City West, AZ, Mary Britton of Vienna, WV.He was preceded in death by his parents, three brothers, Denver, David and Robert Carmichael, and three sisters, Ila Schiefer, Betty Jo Mulligan, & Juanita Bruestle.Services will be Sunday at 2:00 PM at the Leavitt Funeral Home, Belpre with Gary Schiefer officiating.  Post #15 of the American will conduct military rites. Burial will follow in the Ravenswood Cemetery.  Friends may call at the funeral home on Saturday from 4:00 to 8:00 PM.Online condolences may be sent to the family at www.LeavittFuneralHome.com.

Wayne E. Hatcher, 88, of Tug Fork - Jackson County Newspapers

Sun, Feb 19, 2012
Goodson of Ravenswood, Whitney and (Marc) Scholl of Ripley, Kendra and (Brandon) Hersman of Evans, Chris and (Caroline) Smith of Conover, NC,  Dave and (Jodi) Smith of Rockport, and Phil Smith of Vienna, and 15 great grandchildren.Service will be 11 a.m. Tuesday, February 7, 2012 at Casto Funeral Home Chapel, Evans, WV, with the Rev. Kelly Snyder officiating. Burial will follow in Fairplain Cemetery, Ripley. Visitation will be from 6 p.m. until 8 p.m. Monday, at the funeral home.In lieu of flowers, the family requests that any donations be made to the Salt Hill Community Church, c/o Patty Hall, 66 Juniper Grove Drive, Cottageville, WV.On line condolences may be sent to:  castofh@gmail.com ...

Omus Hirshbein, Classical Music Administrator, Dies at 77

Thu, Jan 5, 2012
Y Chamber Symphony. And he helped build an audience for young performers by offering tickets to their recitals as bonuses for series subscriptions. Another of his innovations, the multidisciplinary “Vienna: 1900” festival, which he produced in association with the Museum of Modern Art in 1986, was a forerunner of the thematic programming that orchestras soon adopted. Mr. Hirshbein left the Y in 1994 to direct the music and opera program at the National Endowment for the Arts. But in 1997, after his budget was slashed from $11 million the year he arrived to $5 million in 1996, he left to become president of Meet the Composer, a service organization that commissions new works and brings composers, ensembles and audiences together. In 2003, with Jacqueline Taylor, his former assistant at the Y, who had become executive director of the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, he started Free for All at Town Hall, an annual series of free concerts meant to attract newcomers to classical music. Earlier in life Mr. Hirshbein had taken up auto racing, as a consequence of his friendship with James Dean, a racing enthusiast. The two had met when Dean was an unknown young actor. Dean was sitting on Mr. Hirshbein’s doorstep one day listening to him practice while waiting for a neighbor to return. When Jessica Hirshbein invited him in, Dean asked Mr. Hirshbein whether he could play Beethoven’s Opus 111 Sonata. “That piece really swings,” Ms. Hirshbein recalled Dean saying. “I love those syncopations.” After Dean was killed in an automobile crash in 1955, Mr. Hirshbein gave up auto racing at his wife’s insistence. (New York Times)

Madelon Stanley, 90, of Parkersburg, - Jackson County Newspapers

Sat, Dec 10, 2011
Ravenswood, WV; Mark Stanley and wife Dixie of Stone Creek, OH; Terri (Stanley) Miller and husband Scott of Huntington, WV; Chris Grose and wife Rebekah of Vincent, OH; Brian Arose and wife Donna of Vienna, WV; and Jeff Grose and wife Candice of Parkersburg, WV; eleven great grandchildren and five great, great grandchildren; and sister Jean Sheets of Parkersburg, WV.In addition to her husband, Madelon was preceded in death by her parents Barney and Pocahontas Guinn of Parkersburg, WV; sisters Naomi Gilson and Hilda Carlson. and brothers James Guinn and Roy Guinn.Funeral services were held on Tuesday at 11:00 AM at Belpre Church of Christ, Belpre, OH.Memorial donations may be made to Ohio Valley University.

Madelon Stanley, 90, of Parkersburg, - Jackson County Newspapers

Sat, Dec 10, 2011
Ravenswood, WV; Mark Stanley and wife Dixie of Stone Creek, OH; Terri (Stanley) Miller and husband Scott of Huntington, WV; Chris Grose and wife Rebekah of Vincent, OH; Brian Arose and wife Donna of Vienna, WV; and Jeff Grose and wife Candice of Parkersburg, WV; eleven great grandchildren and five great, great grandchildren; and sister Jean Sheets of Parkersburg, WV.In addition to her husband, Madelon was preceded in death by her parents Barney and Pocahontas Guinn of Parkersburg, WV; sisters Naomi Gilson and Hilda Carlson. and brothers James Guinn and Roy Guinn.Funeral services were held on Tuesday at 11:00 AM at Belpre Church of Christ, Belpre, OH.Memorial donations may be made to Ohio Valley University.

Arthur Klaffka, WWII vet, Postal Service employee

Sat, Nov 26, 2011
B-24 top turret gunner in the European Theater during the war. Mr. Klaffka was the only survivor of his B-24, The Calamity Jane, after a direct hit on the bomb bay over an oil refinery near Vienna, Austria. Mr. Klaffka was captured and held as a prisoner of war. He later received the Purple Heart and several other medals for his service. After the war, Mr. Klaffka began a long career working for the U. S. Postal Service. His first position was as a mail handler at the Central Terminal in Buffalo, loading and unloading trains. He later became a postal railway clerk, then a distribution window clerk at the Buffalo International Airport, and eventually quality control manager. He retired in 1985 with 41 years of service. While working for the Post Office, Mr. Klaffka earned an associate degree in Applied Science at Erie Community Col... (The Buffalo News)

Read any good personal letters lately? Me neither - The Associated Press

Thu, Oct 20, 2011
Americans together. "If I write, it's only to my mother and it's a quick note," said Andy Aldrich, an education program coordinator who lives in Vienna, Va. He said he sends his mother a hand-written letter about once every four months. Otherwise, Aldrich said he mostly communicates through emails, text messages and Skype with relatives. Bob Cvetic, of Waldorf, Md., a health specialist with a federal law enforcement agency, said different forms of communication have different purposes. "Emails are something quick," he said. "Letters are letters. When I'm writing a letter to a friend, it's a personal note. You can't send an email saying 'hey, sorry to hear you lost your father.'" Mike Stanley of Silver Spring, Md., said he mostly uses the Postal Service to pay bills. He did send his sister a birthday card in August. "I don't send letters. I use the cellphone or email," he said. "It's faster." Even Stanley's mailing of bill payments is no longer the norm, with the post office reporting that, "for the first time, in 2010, fewer than 50 percent of all bills were paid by mail." The Postal Service says the decline in letter-writing is "primarily driven by the adoption of the Internet as a preferred method of communication." The loss of that lucrative first-class mail is just one part of the agency's financial troubles, along with payment of bills via Internet and a decline in other mail. The Postal Service is facing losses of $8 b...

Read any good personal letters lately? Me neither - The Associated Press

Thu, Oct 20, 2011
Americans together. "If I write, it's only to my mother and it's a quick note," said Andy Aldrich, an education program coordinator who lives in Vienna, Va. He said he sends his mother a hand-written letter about once every four months. Otherwise, Aldrich said he mostly communicates through emails, text messages and Skype with relatives. Bob Cvetic, of Waldorf, Md., a health specialist with a federal law enforcement agency, said different forms of communication have different purposes. "Emails are something quick," he said. "Letters are letters. When I'm writing a letter to a friend, it's a personal note. You can't send an email saying 'hey, sorry to hear you lost your father.'" Mike Stanley of Silver Spring, Md., said he mostly uses the Postal Service to pay bills. He did send his sister a birthday card in August. "I don't send letters. I use the cellphone or email," he said. "It's faster." Even Stanley's mailing of bill payments is no longer the norm, with the post office reporting that, "for the first time, in 2010, fewer than 50 percent of all bills were paid by mail." The Postal Service says the decline in letter-writing is "primarily driven by the adoption of the Internet as a preferred method of communication." The loss of that lucrative first-class mail is just one part of the agency's financial troubles, along with payment of bills via Internet and a decline in other mail. The Postal Service is facing losses of $8 b...

Harry (Skip) Sorman Jr.

Mon, Oct 17, 2011
Stacie. Skip is survived by his wife of 45 years, Charlotte, sister Nancy Poldoski (her friend Frank Olsen) of Duluth, cousin Marilyn Cone (Norm) of Vienna, VA and her son, sister-in-law; Jean Karapetsas (Jim) of Forrest Lake, Judy Frantzen of Cloquet, Cathy, Cathy Campbell and Connie Dang of Duluth, and his much loved nieces, neph­ews, goddaughter and their families and his dear and special friends. The family would like to thank his Oncologist, Dr. Bret Friday, all the special nurses in the Infusion Center, the staff at Solvay Hospice House for their wonderful care during his last days, Dr. Normand and Dr. Irons for their kindness and everyone for the outpouring of love and support during this difficult time. Memorial services will be held at the Cremation Society of Minnesota on Wednesday, October 19, 2011, at 2 p.m. with visitation one hour prior to the service. In lieu of flowers, memorials are preferred to the National Foundation for Cancer Research, Animal Allies of Duluth or memorial of your choice. Tags: local, news, obituaries Harry (Skip) Sorman Jr. Ralph Edward Halvorson Florence L. Swanson ... (Duluth News Tribune)

You never write any more; well, hardly anyone does - Atlanta Journal Constitution

Tue, Oct 4, 2011
Americans together. "If I write, it's only to my mother and it's a quick note," said Andy Aldrich, an education program coordinator who lives in Vienna, Va. He said he sends his mother a hand-written letter about once every four months. Otherwise, Aldrich said he mostly communicates through emails, text messages and Skype with relatives. Bob Cvetic, of Waldorf, Md., a health specialist with a federal law enforcement agency, said different forms of communication have different purposes. "Emails are something quick," he said. "Letters are letters. When I'm writing a letter to a friend, it's a personal note. You can't send an email saying 'hey, sorry to hear you lost your father.'" Mike Stanley of Silver Spring, Md., said he mostly uses the Postal Service to pay bills. He did send his sister a birthday card in August. "I don't send letters. I use the cellphone or email," he said. "It's faster." Even Stanley's mailing of bill payments is no longer the norm, with the post office reporting that, "for the first time, in 2010, fewer than 50 percent of all bills were paid by mail." The Postal Service says the decline in letter-writing is "primarily driven by the adoption of the Internet as a preferred method of communication." The loss of that lucrative first-class mail is just one part of the agency's financial troubles, along with payment of bills via Internet and a decline in other mail. The Postal Service is facing losses of $8 billion or more this year. The loss to what people in the future know about us today may be incalculable. In earlier times the "art" of letter writing was formally taught, explained Newbold. "Letters were the prime medium of communication among individuals and even important in communities as letters were shared, read aloud and published," he said. "Letters did the cultural work that academic journals, book reviews, magazines, legal documents, business memos, diplomatic cables, etc. do now. They were also obviously important in more intimate senses, among family, close friends, lovers, and suitors in initiating and preserving personal relationships and holding things together when distance was a real and unsurmountable obstacle." "It's too early to tell with any certainty whether people are using email, texting, Twitter tweets, Facebook status updates, and so on in the same ways that we earlier relied on the letter for; they are probably using each of these media in different ways, some of which allow people to get closer to each other and engage in friendly or intimate exchange. It seems that email is the most letter-like medium," added Newbold. But Aaron Sachs, a professor of American Studies and History at Cornell University, said, "One of the ironies for me is that everyone talks about electronic media bringing people closer together, and I think this is a way we wind up more separate. We don't have the intimacy that we have when we go to the attic and read grandma's letters." "Part of the reason I like being a historian is the sensory experience we have when dealing with old documents" and letters, he said. "Sometimes, when people ask me what I do, I say I read other people's mail." "Handwriting is an aspect of people's identity," he added. "Back in the day, when you wrote a lett...




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