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Rifle, CO  Funeral Homes

The following funeral service provider list is in Rifle, Colorado. Please select a funeral home listing below to view more details about local services provided.
 
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Rifle Funeral Home
1400 Access Road
Rifle , CO 81650
(970) 625-1234
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Morning Jolt: Alex Trebek recovering from heart attack - Suburbanite

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
Navy SEALs training. Participants do sprints, pushups, get thrown into pools with their legs and hands tied, jump out of moving helicopters and fire sniper rifles like a true member of The Green Faces. GateHouse News Service ...

Joseph Wych - Sioux City Journal

Mon, Jun 25, 2012
France, Belgium and Germany. For his service to his country, he was awarded six Bronze Service Stars, the Presidential Unit Citation Ribbon, World War II Victory Medal, Good Conduct Medal and Rifle Sharpshooter Badge. On Oct. 10, 1945, he and his crew left Marseille, France, to head back to the U.S. On Oct. 19, 1945, they arrived in Norfolk, Va. He was honorably discharged at Camp McCoy, Wis. Following the service, he returned to Washta and started farming with his parents until renting a nearby farm in 1947. It was during this time he met his future wife, Marg Daniel. He was united in marriage to Marg on June 10, 1947, at the Kingsley United Methodist Church. Marg and Joe moved to a farm near Cherokee, Iowa, for a short time before moving to their current homestead south of Akron in January of 1949. Marg passed away Sept. 3, 2011. Joe was a member of the Wesley United Methodist Church in Akron, the Hoschler American Legion Post 186 of Akron, and Plymouth County Farm Bureau. He was on the board of directors of the Akron Farmers Co-op for 12 years. He and Marg enjoyed several trips overseas to see relatives in England and Europe and other trips to Mexico and around the U.S. He and Marg enjoyed going to Akron High School sporting events for many years. They had been fans of Akron-Westfield sports for more than 60 years. Joe and Marg received the “Fan of the Year” award two times. They also served as parade marshals for the Homecoming celebration. Joe enjoyed bowling. He bowled in three leagues and was inducted into the Akron Lanes Hall of Fame. He was an avid fan of the New York Yankees, Boston Celtics, Indianapolis Colts and the Iowa Hawkeyes. Joe loved the times spent with family and friends. He will be greatly missed Survivors include his three sons, Bob Wych (Debbie) of Sedona, Ariz., Jerry Wych of Fullerton, Calif., and Ron Wych (Sandy) of Akron, Iowa; six grandchildren, Heidi Cline (Nate), Aaron Wych (Abbi), Charity Leekley, Tori Dye (fiance, Jason Pangburn), Joe Wych, and Jake Wych; a great-granddaughter, Hope Hasenbank; a sister-in-law, Patricia White; and several nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents; his wife, Marg; and two brothers, Paul and Kenneth. Memorials c...

Richard “Dick” Laurence Barber - Richmond County Daily Journal

Wed, Feb 8, 2012
University of Connecticut where he majored in Chemistry and Mechanical Engineering. He served his country for 6 years in the CT Army National Guard and qualified as an expert marksman in Rifle, Pistol and the 81mm mortar. He worked in the mining and minerals processing industry for 38 years. He worked with The Feldspar Corporation for 26 years and served on their board of directors. While at Feldspar he served as president and director of the North Carolina Mining Association along with several other boards and organizations including the, NCSU Minerals Research Lab Advisory Board and the NC Geological Survey Advisory Board. He later finished his career at WR Bonsal in Lilesville, NC. After his retirement in the mining industry, he worked as a consultant where he was a well respected and trusted resource in his field. He was active in the community and enjoyed volunteering his time to help others. While in Spruce Pine, He was an active member at St Luciens Catholic Church and was a member of the Church Council. He served on the Mitchell County Economic Development Commission and a member of the Blue Ridge Hospital System Board of Directors. In Rockingham, He was an active member of St. James Catholic Church and was on the parish council. He was also Vice President of the Richmond County Amateur Radio Club. When he was not involved in community work, he enjoyed fishing, hunting, target shooting, woodworking, computers and Amateur Radio(W1GFM). He loved demonstrating amateur radio for the local Spruce Pine school children and on one occasion provided them an opportunity to speak with the astronauts aboard the space shuttle earning him “coolest Dad in the school” status. He was also a pilot for close to 40 years and loved to take people up for their first plane ride. He loved to make people la...

Frank K. Hartney, retired Buffalo fire lieutenant

Tue, Jan 31, 2012
Suburban Hospital, Amherst, after a short illness. He was 88. Born in Buffalo, he was a 1941 graduate of Canisius High School and was a member of the school’s Sports Hall of Fame. He served as a rifleman in the Marine Corps in the Pacific during World War II. He received an Officers Heroism Award from the Fire Department in 1976. He retired in 1985. His wife of 65 years, Joanne Pessler Hartney, died in 2010. Surviving are a son, Dr. Michael; eight daughters, Mary Anne Roll, Kathleen, Peggy Riley, Jane, Patricia Ale... (The Buffalo News)

Thurmon Smith - Sturgis Journal

Thu, Dec 29, 2011
U.S. Army during the Vietnam War earning the rank of SP4. During his service he was awarded the Vietnam Service Medal, Vietnam Campaign Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Expert Badge (Rifle) and the Combat Infantry Badge. He was a life member of Jack Johnston Chapter #88 Disabled American Veterans and enjoyed fishing and time spent with his family.Thurmon is survived by his loving wife of 47 years, Shirley; two daughters, Jennifer (Tony) Jones of Kendallville, Ind., and Melissa (Tim) Kovak of Troy; three sons, David (Helen Marioni) Smith of Sturgis, Dennis (Joyce Green) Smith of Sturgis and Scott (Patty) Smith of Sturgis; eight grandchildren, Kyle Smith, Brittany Smith, Andrea Smith, Bryant Smith, Kayla Garison, Austin Smith, Samantha Smith and Jacob Shears; five great-grandchildren, Bryce, Mayson, Curtis, Naomi and Sophie, two sisters, Meletha Fields of Kentucky and Dorothy Dettrow of Ohio; four brothers, Herman Smi...

The Star's Top 100 Books of 2011 - Kansas City Star

Wed, Dec 7, 2011
Bonnie Jo Campbell (Norton). Invoking the spirit of Huck Finn and the skill of Annie Oakley, this stark coming-of-age tale sets 16-year-old Margo Crane adrift with little more than her wits and her rifle on an innocence-wrecking goose chase to find her wayward mother. •  “Open City,” by Teju Cole (Random House). During a series of long walks and other outings in Manhattan, an introspective medical student reflects on his adopted home city, personal relationships, familial bonds, chance encounters, art, death and politics. •  “Orientation,” by Daniel Orozco (Faber & Faber). This collection of short stories offers a wry, comical look at office life and the work world and leaves no desk or cubicle unscathed. •  “The Outlaw Album,” by Daniel Woodrell (Little, Brown). After reading the first sentence of “The Echo of Neighborly Bones,” the first story included in this collection — “Once Boshell finally killed his neighbor he couldn’t seem to quit killing him” — there’s no choice but to keep reading. •  “The Pale King,” by David Foster Wallace (Little, Brown). Certainly not the most fully realized novel of the year, but this posthumously published tale of taxes and boredom boasts more than a few flashes of ingenuity. •  “Ready Player One,” by Ernest Cline (Crown). In 2044, living online is as dangerous as the real world. Teen Wade Watts participates in an online quest for a vast fortune, but the hit points are real, and there are no extra lives to bank on. •  span cla...

Confederate soldiers remembered by descendants - LubbockOnline.com

Sun, Dec 4, 2011
Commission, the Stephen Wilkinson Chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy, the South Plains Genealogical Society, and relatives of Greathouse. A Confederate color guard with period rifles firing volleys of gunpowder was provided by the Amarillo-based South Plains Brigade of the Sons of the Confederacy. Women dressed in black with veiled faces, representing an auxiliary called the Order of the Confederate Rose, laid flowers on the gravesite. But Greathouse isn’t the only one remembered in this region. A five-year research project by Danella Dickson filled in gaps of history for 65 Confederate veterans who lived in Lubbock County after the war was over. And Lubbock County wasn’t the only location for migrating Confederate soldiers. A project compiled by Maisie Jones in the form of obituaries, has been titled “Civil War Veterans Buried in Hale County.” It wa...

Newark avenue named after a veteran of the Army of Northern Virginia - The Newark Advocate

Sun, Nov 13, 2011
Confederacy. Henry Day was 21 and living in Warrenton, Va., when the war started. He enrolled as a private on April 22, 1861, in the 17th Virginia Infantry, Company K, also known as the "Warrenton Rifles." He was not the only Day to enlist; his brother, Dr. Douglas Day, who had a practice in Zanesville, had enlisted as a surgeon in the 22nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry; that is, until their sister heard about it and wrote the doctor on May 22, 1861. The letter said in part, "We w...

Decorated WWII vet O'Donnell, survivor of Normandy invasion, dies at 89 - Wisconsin State Journal

Sat, Nov 12, 2011
An article in the Fort Sheridan Tower in 1951 noted he was the most decorated soldier at the Illinois base. He earned the award by killing nine enemy soldiers with his rifle and grenades as he and his squad withdrew during a German counterattack on June 10, 1944. His son, Jim, said he endured back operations and poor vision for the rest of his life from injuries suffered in infantry campaigns and battles in Africa, Sicily and Normandy and on into Germany. He stayed in after the war, and was sent to Japan and Korea. He and wife Rita raised six children — all born in different states — on Commonwealth Avenue in Madison. Jim said Wednesday that his dad was a library assistant at the Madison Public Library, working in the card catalogues. "He was a soft-spoken guy, a great dad," Jim O'Donnell said. "He didn't talk about his time in the war a lot. He always said he was no hero. He said the heroes were the ones who didn't make it back," he said. "I think of him as my hero." In his obituary, his family said Jack O'Donnell enjoyed writing poetry and considered sharing important. He liked baseball and a good joke. Apple pie and ice cream "brought him comfort on good days and bad." Jack O'Donnell's funeral will be private on Friday, Veterans Day.

Decorated WWII vet O'Donnell, survivor of Normandy invasion, dies at 89 - Wisconsin State Journal

Sat, Nov 12, 2011
An article in the Fort Sheridan Tower in 1951 noted he was the most decorated soldier at the Illinois base. He earned the award by killing nine enemy soldiers with his rifle and grenades as he and his squad withdrew during a German counterattack on June 10, 1944. His son, Jim, said he endured back operations and poor vision for the rest of his life from injuries suffered in infantry campaigns and battles in Africa, Sicily and Normandy and on into Germany. He stayed in after the war, and was sent to Japan and Korea. He and wife Rita raised six children — all born in different states — on Commonwealth Avenue in Madison. Jim said Wednesday that his dad was a library assistant at the Madison Public Library, working in the card catalogues. "He was a soft-spoken guy, a great dad," Jim O'Donnell said. "He didn't talk about his time in the war a lot. He always said he was no hero. He said the heroes were the ones who didn't make it back," he said. "I think of him as my hero." In his obituary, his family said Jack O'Donnell enjoyed writing poetry and considered sharing important. He liked baseball and a good joke. Apple pie and ice cream "brought him comfort on good days and bad." Jack O'Donnell's funeral will be private on Friday, Veterans Day.




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