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Funeral Homes > Colorado > Rangely

Rangely, CO  Funeral Homes

The following funeral service provider list is in Rangely, Colorado. Please select a funeral home listing below to view more details about local services provided.
 
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Cochran Memorial Chapels
747 East Main Street
Rangely , CO 81648
(970) 675-5777
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Rangely Mortuary
258 East Main Street
Rangely , CO 81648
(970) 675-5777
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Local Obituaries and Funeral Notice News


Tiger Looks Like Tiger Again - Wall Street Journal (blog)

Sun, Apr 1, 2012
At the conclusion of the tournament’s second weekend, on the other hand, all looks strangely … familiar. Yes, the seemingly unbeatable juggernaut that is the University of Kentucky is the only number one seed to have made it to the Final Four. But the programs that will join the Wildcats in New Orleans—second-seeded Ohio State and Kansas and fourth-seeded Louisville, which will replay its annual rivalry game with UK for far higher stakes on Saturday—are hardly upstarts. There is no Virginia Commonwealth or George Mason or Butler, here. This year’s Final Four, it seems, is for big boys only. “The vibe is already different,” Sports Illustrated’s Luke Winn writes. “There is the sense that the tournament has been building up to this quartet, rather than winding down. That after so many buzzer-beaters gone wrong, so many games bogged down by painful officiating, we are due for a few epics.” At the very least, we’ll get a pair of rematches in the short term—Kansas and Ohio State played earlier this year while the Buckeyes were without star forward Jared Sullinger, and the Jayhawks rolled. That’s something that tends to happen for the Buckeyes, who depend a great deal on their frontcourt centerpiece. Kentucky and Louisville play each other every year, but this is the first time the in-state rivals have met in the Final Four. Louisville hung with the ‘Cats earlier this season before falling to them like almost everyone else did. Things don’t get any easier now. This remains a super-motivated Wildcats team led by coach of great talent and a certain complicated charm and freshman forward Anthony Davis, the best player in college basketball. All that talent is not a guarantee of anything, of course. Those don’t exist at this time in the college hoops season. * * * The obituaries for Bert Sugar, who died over the weekend at the age of 74, will mostly credit him as a boxing writer and historian. And while Sugar—who was, for decades, instantly recognizable even to non-boxing fans for his broad-brimmed hats and well-chewed, never-lit cigar—did know and talk and write a great deal about the sport, he was also far more than a boxing writer. Sugar’s name graced over 100 books, most of which dealt with the sweet science, and he edited both Boxing Illustrated and the Ring. But he was first and foremost a personality, a sportswriter who was mostly a raconteur and wholly a character and, in most every way, a man from a more interesting age who nevertheless made himself at home in our more staid, brand-sensitive one. “When famous people men die we love to say, ‘There will never be another one like him,’ but in Bert Sugar’s case, I’m pretty sure it’s true. Because if Bert Sugar ...

Police and fire log: Tuesday, Dec. 27, 2011 - Ukiah Daily Journal

Thu, Dec 29, 2011
SON ON DRUGS -- Caller using a payphone at a gas station in the 900 block of North State Street reported at 2:39 p.m. Saturday that she caught her son with drugs and he was acting strangely, then the woman hung up. An officer responded but did not locate either party. THIEVES TRYING TO GET VICTIM TO DO DRUGS -- Caller in the 100 block of Washington Court reported at 8:34 p.m. Saturday that two men were at her friend's house trying to get him to do drugs so they could steal his stuff. An officer responded and the suspects left the house. The following were compiled from reports prepared by the Ukiah Police Department regarding calls handled by the Fort Bragg Police Department. SUSPICIOUS PURCHASE -- Caller from Rite-Aid on South Main Street reported at 6:14 p.m. Friday that a man tried to use a credit card to pay for $500 worth of items and when asked for identification, the man left. SHOPLIFTER -- An officer responded to Rite-Aid on South Main Street at 4:05 p.m. Saturday and arrested a 31-year-old Fort Bragg woman for theft. SON STOLE PURSE -- Caller on East Cypress Street reported at 6:58 p.m. Saturday that her son stole her purse and was headed to Reno. An officer responded and took a report. WOMAN IN POST OFFICE -- Caller in the 200 block of North Franklin Street reported at 10:29 p.m. Saturday that a woman was camping inside the post office. Those arrested by law enforcement officers are innocent until proven guilty. People reported as having been arrested may contact the Daily Journal once their case has been concluded so the results can be reported. Those who feel the information is in error should contact the appropriate agency. In the case of those arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of an intoxicant: all DUI cases reported by law enforcement agencies are reported by the newspaper. The Daily Journal makes no exceptions. CORRECTIONS The Ukiah Daily Journal reserves this space to correct errors or make clarifications to news articles. Significant errors in obituary notices or birth announcements will result in reprinting the entire article. Errors may be reported to the editor, 468-3526.

Our products, ourselves: The glorification and demonization of Steve Jobs - Washington Post (blog)

Thu, Oct 13, 2011
Of course the philosophy of being true to oneself is inert in the face of genuine evil -- but so is traditional religion and the hope of an afterlife. See under: Holocaust, Rwanda genocide, slavery, etc. Yes, slavery. For every religion that opposed slavery when the antislavery movement began in England in the seventeenth century, there were many more religions that upheld it. Take a look at John Greenleaf Whittier’s once-famous poem, “The Preacher,” about the cleric who “Bade the slave-ships speed from coast to coast/Fanned by the wings of the Holy Ghost.” But I digress. The real problem I have with the Jobs-worshippers and critics, both secular and religious, is that they attribute way too much importance to what are, after all, only products. Even Crouch says that Jobs “kept hope alive” through a decade in which nothing but technology seemed to improve. He sees great significance in the fact that Jobs introduced the iPod only a month after the World Trade Center attacks in 2001. Really? I’ll admit that I wasn’t one of those who rushed out to purchase an iPod; nothing would have induced me stand in line for hours to buy what was, after all, only a smaller, portable and more convenient music delivery system that would be much cheaper a year later. However, the iPod as a hopeful alternative to brooding about terrorism is a laughable concept. Jobs was without a doubt an imaginative and marketing genius, and the comparisons to Thomas Edison and Henry Ford in obituaries are completely apt. But as for our never seeing another person as inventive in our lifetime, that is utterly irrelevant. If the past is any guide, our children or grandchildren will certainly see another such person in their lifetimes, unless we obliterate our species through sheer greed, stupidity and withdrawal from real social life (the latter encouraged by many of Jobs’s products). I don’t know why the people who are putting soon-to-be-decaying apples in front of Jobs’s stores don’t put them in front of their computers instead. The idolators are mourning the products, not the man, because we know almost nothing about Jobs as a person. His somewhat personal Stanford address was an exception. For the most part, we only saw Jobs when he was stepp...

Our products, ourselves: The glorification and demonization of Steve Jobs - Washington Post (blog)

Thu, Oct 13, 2011
Of course the philosophy of being true to oneself is inert in the face of genuine evil -- but so is traditional religion and the hope of an afterlife. See under: Holocaust, Rwanda genocide, slavery, etc. Yes, slavery. For every religion that opposed slavery when the antislavery movement began in England in the seventeenth century, there were many more religions that upheld it. Take a look at John Greenleaf Whittier’s once-famous poem, “The Preacher,” about the cleric who “Bade the slave-ships speed from coast to coast/Fanned by the wings of the Holy Ghost.” But I digress. The real problem I have with the Jobs-worshippers and critics, both secular and religious, is that they attribute way too much importance to what are, after all, only products. Even Crouch says that Jobs “kept hope alive” through a decade in which nothing but technology seemed to improve. He sees great significance in the fact that Jobs introduced the iPod only a month after the World Trade Center attacks in 2001. Really? I’ll admit that I wasn’t one of those who rushed out to purchase an iPod; nothing would have induced me stand in line for hours to buy what was, after all, only a smaller, portable and more convenient music delivery system that would be much cheaper a year later. However, the iPod as a hopeful alternative to brooding about terrorism is a laughable concept. Jobs was without a doubt an imaginative and marketing genius, and the comparisons to Thomas Edison and Henry Ford in obituaries are completely apt. But as for our never seeing another person as inventive in our lifetime, that is utterly irrelevant. If the past is any guide, our children or grandchildren will certainly see another such person in their lifetimes, unless we obliterate our species through sheer greed, stupidity and withdrawal from real social life (the latter encouraged by many of Jobs’s products). I don’t know why the people who are putting soon-to-be-decaying apples in front of Jobs’s stores don’t put them in front of their computers instead. The idolators are mourning the products, not the man, because we know almost nothing about Jobs as a person. His somewhat personal Stanford address was an exception. For the most part, we only saw Jobs when he was stepp...




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